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Strength and Impact Toughness of High Strength Steel Weld Metals: Influence of Welding Method, Dilution and Cooling Rate
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. (PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2560-0531
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. (PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8822-2705
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. (PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0234-3168
SSAB AB, Oxelösund, Sweden.
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2015 (English)In: Proceedings of IIW International Conference, High-Strength Materials: Challenges and Applications, 2-3 July 2015, Helsinki, Finland, Helsingfors, 2015, 1-9 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Producing welds with properties matching those of the steel is a challenge at high strength levels. The present study has investigated how the choice of welding method affects weld metal mechanical properties through effects on dilution and cooling rate. Butt welds were produced in 12 mm plates in 777 MPa and 1193 MPa yield strength steels. Conventional arc welding methods including manual metal arc, gas metal arc welding, rapid arc welding and submerged arc welding were used as well as laser-gas metal arc hybrid welding. Filler materials with nominal yield strengths between 810 and 1000 MPa were used. Cooling times between 800 C and 500 C were varied between 5s and 15s and measured by insertion of thermocouples into the weld pool.High quality welds were produced efficiently with all welding methods even though dilution varied between 3%, for manual metal arc welding, to 73% for laser-hybrid welding. Low dilution, rapid cooling and single pass welding contributed to higher strength. Overmatching weld metal strength was achieved for the less strong steel and weld yield strengths of >1000 MPa were recorded for the stronger steel. Fracture in transverse tensile testing was always located in base material or HAZ. Impact toughness was higher for lower strength and low dilution. Results are discussed relating choice of welding method and cooling rate to weld metal properties for different steel strength levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsingfors, 2015. 1-9 p.
Keyword [en]
Welding, high strength steels, weld metal, strength, hardness, toughness, dilution
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Production Technology; ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-8637OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-8637DiVA: diva2:868887
Conference
IIW International Conference High-Strength Materials - Challenges and Applications 2-3July 2015, Helsinki, Finland
Available from: 2015-11-12 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2016-02-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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