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Parenting Across Cultures: Parental attributions, attitudes and behaviour
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7881-5670
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Previously studies in parenting have mainly been conducted in Western countries. Not uncommonly results from such studies are used to describe general, worldwide trends. In an attempt to make the field of parenting research more culturally heterogeneous, an international research project, Parenting Across Cultures, was started. The project includes nine participant countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and USA) and its purpose is to examine parenting across cultures. This thesis is based on reports from parent participants. The aim of Study I was to investigate mothers’ and fathers’ (77 participants from each group) attributions and attitudes in Sweden. The results revealed that Swedish parents are more polarized in their attitudes than in their attributions, they think more alike for parenting attitudes and there was greater variability for parenting attributions, particularly regarding uncontrollable success, as opposed to attributions regarding adult- or child-controlled failure. Regarding attitudes, mothers and fathers reported more progressive than authoritarian attitudes. Fathers reported higher adult-controlled failure and child-controlled failure attributions than mothers. In Study II the aim was to assess whether mothers’ and fathers’ self-reports of acceptance-rejection, warmth, and hostility/rejection/neglect of their children differ in the nine countries. A total of 1996 parents (998 mothers and 998 fathers) participated in the study. Mothers and fathers reported high acceptance and warmth and low rejection and hostility/rejection/neglect (HRN) of their children in all nine countries. Despite the overwhelmingly high levels of acceptance and low levels of rejection across all countries, and despite our use of statistical controls for parental age, education, social desirability, and child age, some systematic differences between countries emerged. In summary, parents in the studies report higher similarity about parenting in some cases, for example concerning acceptance and warmth and hostility/rejection/neglect, but lower in others, such as the Swedish parents’ reports about attributions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: University of Gothenburg , 2013. , 35 p.
Series
Avhandling / Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet, ISSN 1101-718X ; 271
Keyword [en]
Parenting attributions, Parenting attitudes, Parenting behavior, Culture
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7997OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-7997DiVA: diva2:848775
Opponent
Available from: 2015-09-15 Created: 2015-08-26 Last updated: 2015-09-15Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Attributions and attitudes of mothers and fathers in Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attributions and attitudes of mothers and fathers in Sweden
2011 (English)In: Parenting, Science and Practice, ISSN 1532-7922, Vol. 11, no 2-3, 177-189 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The present study examined mean level similarities and differences as well as correlations between mothers' and fathers' attributions regarding successes and failures in caregiving situations and progressive versus authoritarian attitudes. Design. Interviews were conducted with mothers and fathers in 77 Swedish families. Results. Fathers reported higher adult-controlled failure and child-controlled failure attributions than did mothers; these differences remained significant after controlling for parents' age, education, and possible social desirability bias. Significant positive correlations were found for mothers' and fathers' progressive attitudes, authoritarian attitudes, and modernity of attitudes after controlling for parents' age, education, and possible social desirability bias. Conclusions. In Sweden, fathers are more likely to attribute failures in caregiving situations to themselves and to children than are mothers, and there is moderate concordance between fathers and mothers within the same family in progressive and authoritarian parenting attitudes. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2011
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-3555 (URN)10.1080/15295192.2011.585565 (DOI)15295192 (ISSN) (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-08-29 Created: 2011-08-29 Last updated: 2015-09-15Bibliographically approved
2. Agreement in Mother and Father Acceptance-Rejection, Warmth, and Hostility/Rejection/ Neglect of Children Across Nine Countries
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreement in Mother and Father Acceptance-Rejection, Warmth, and Hostility/Rejection/ Neglect of Children Across Nine Countries
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Cross-cultural research, ISSN 1069-3971, E-ISSN 1552-3578, Vol. 46, no 3, 191-223 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The authors assessed whether mothers' and fathers' self-reports of acceptance-rejection, warmth, and hostility/rejection/neglect (HRN) of their preadolescent children differ cross-nationally and relative to the gender of the parent and child in 10 communities in 9 countries, including China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States (N = 998 families). Mothers and fathers in all countries reported a high degree of acceptance and warmth, and a low degree of HRN, but countries also varied. Mothers reported greater acceptance of children than fathers in China, Italy, Sweden, and the United States, and these effects were accounted for by greater self-reported warmth in mothers than in fathers in China, Italy, the Philippines, Sweden, and Thailand and less HRN in mothers than in fathers in Sweden. Fathers reported greater warmth than mothers in Kenya. Mother and father acceptance-rejection were moderately correlated. Relative levels of mother and father acceptance and rejection appear to be country specific. © 2012 SAGE Publications.

Keyword
acceptance, culture, parenting, rejection
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-4619 (URN)10.1177/1069397112440931 (DOI)000307448300001 ()2-s2.0-84865053622 (Scopus ID)10693971 (ISSN) (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-09-06 Created: 2012-09-06 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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