Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hostile attributional bias and aggressive behavior in global context
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham.
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham.
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham.
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3328-6538
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 30, p. 9310-9315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We tested a model that children’s tendency to attribute hostile intent to others in response to provocation is a key psychological process that statistically accounts for individual differences in reactive aggressive behavior and that this mechanism contributes to global group differences in children’s chronic aggressive behavior problems. Participants were 1,299 children (mean age at year 1 = 8.3 y; 51% girls) from 12 diverse ecological-context groups in nine countries worldwide, followed across 4 y. In year 3, each child was presented with each of 10 hypothetical vignettes depicting an ambiguous provocation toward the child and was asked to attribute the likely intent of the provocateur (coded as benign or hostile) and to predict his or her own behavioral response (coded as nonaggression or reactive aggression). Mothers and children independently rated the child’s chronic aggressive behavior problems in years 2, 3, and 4. In every ecological group, in those situations in which a child attributed hostile intent to a peer, that child was more likely to report that he or she would respond with reactive aggression than in situations when that same child attributed benign intent. Across children, hostile attributional bias scores predicted higher mother- and child-rated chronic aggressive behavior problems, even controlling for prior aggression. Ecological group differences in the tendency for children to attribute hostile intent statistically accounted for a significant portion of group differences in chronic aggressive behavior problems. The findings suggest a psychological mechanism for group differences in aggressive behavior and point to potential interventions to reduce aggressive behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 112, no 30, p. 9310-9315
Keywords [en]
aggressive behavior, cultural differences, hostile attribution, interpersonal conflict, social cognition
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7893DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1418572112ISI: 000358656500058Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84938125119OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-7893DiVA, id: diva2:845850
Note

Published online before print July 13, 2015,

Available from: 2015-08-13 Created: 2015-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Sorbring, Emma

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sorbring, Emma
By organisation
Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies
In the same journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 119 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf