Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Young Women With Anorexia Nervosa
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3702-8202
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe how young women living with self-identified anorexia narrate about their lives by blogging. Thirteen Swedish blogs were chosen and analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. The results described falling ill, the illness itself, and the path to recovery. Low self-esteem, depressed state of mind, and self-destructive behavior were typical signs at the start of the illness. The women’s lives were characterized by a need for controlling their body by tormenting it and by the illness demanding all their concentration and energy. The women suffered from the feeling of being a disappointment to their family members. The illness was like an enemy that had to be defeated with the help of family members, health care professionals, and by means of therapy. A turning point occurred when the women felt at their worst or had tired of the illness and could concentrate on something other than their body and the eating disorder. Suffering from self-identified anorexia was described as experiencing low self-esteem. The illness took all of the women’s time and energy. For a turning point to be reached, the women needed support from family, friends, and health care professionals, including the use of distractions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 5, no 1
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7626DOI: 10.1177/2158244015576549OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-7626DiVA: diva2:815845
Note

Published 17 March 2015

Available from: 2015-06-02 Created: 2015-05-30 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Dahlborg Lyckhage, ElisabethBerndtsson, Ina

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Dahlborg Lyckhage, ElisabethBerndtsson, Ina
By organisation
Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate levelDivision of Nursing
In the same journal
SAGE Open
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 161 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf