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Who is “we” in the classroom of Religious Education?
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5192-6327
2012 (English)In: NFPF/NERA'S 40TH CONGRESS: Abstract book, 2012, -w 247 p.Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to analyze some of the discourses that can be discerned in a classroom of Religious Education in upper secondary school in Sweden. It is based on the findings of participant observation conducted during 2011 in two different schools. The interpretative approach, formulated by Robert Jackson (1997, 2004), is used in analyzing interactions in the classroom. A key concept in the interpretative approach is representation, which means that religions are not seen as homogeneous phenomena but multidimensional and changing and concerns how this is expressed in the context of Religious Education. The present paper focuses on perspectives and representations of the content of Religious Education that appears in the classroom. The analysis of the classroom observations show that a secular discourse dominates in the classroom and can be described as the norm. As a result, ”we” are described by concepts such as scientificity, rationality, modernity and development. Religiosity and belonging to a faith is portrayed as opposed to a modern worldview, and religious people in general are often labeled as deviant and outmoded. Simultaneously, a national/cultural discourse is discernible in which ”we” is described as Christian, in the sense of belonging to a Christian culture which is presented as opposed to other cultures, especially in relation to Muslim culture. One does not know much about how Religious Education is shaped in the classroom practice. By describing how knowledge is constructed within Religious Education and what opinions and definitions that appears in different contexts, we get a better understanding of the classroom practice, which may form the basis for dialogue in a pluralistic society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. -w 247 p.
National Category
Religious Studies Pedagogical Work
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Pedagogics; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Educational science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7470OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-7470DiVA: diva2:798017
Conference
“Everyday life, education and their transformations in a Nordic and globalized context”, the 40th NFPF/NERA Congress, Copenhagen. 8 – 10 March, 2012
Available from: 2015-03-25 Created: 2015-03-25 Last updated: 2016-01-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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Output format
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