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Manning the State: Negotiating Masculinity in the New Norway of 1814
University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2066-3616
2014 (English)In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 22, no 2, 116-130 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gender historians have identified the period around 1800 as a crucial time for transforming elite masculinities in Europe: there were shifts away from ideals of polite gentlemen towards more martial forms of manhood; and this was a transition period away from more fluid notions of masculinity and an emphasis on the mixing of male and female towards a period of upholding stricter binaries between male and female. This article contributes to scholarship on the intersection of masculinities and states by centring on the formation of a new, partially independent Norway around 1814, when the Norwegian constitution was crafted. I use the analysis of Norway as an entry to exploring broader European trends at that time. As this article will show, Norwegian ideals of masculinity suitable for state office are a good illustration of more general interpretations of elite manhood in northern Europe. Norwegian constructions did offer a twist, however, as they idealized the Norwegian elite male as rough, unsophisticated, and natural.

In contrast with other forms of elite state-bearing European masculinity, which emphasized

advancement and cultivation, Norwegian masculinity was celebrated for its lack of refinement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 22, no 2, 116-130 p.
Keyword [en]
masculinity, elite masculinity, Norway, 1814, state identity
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Political science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7258DOI: 10.1080/08038740.2013.869621OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-7258DiVA: diva2:777551
Note

Finansierad av the Research Council of Norway

Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08038740.2013.869621#.VK6kSk10x9A

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Towns, Ann

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