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Working with Manchester triage: job satisfaction in nursing
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level.
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9463-7341
2014 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing: Oral abstracts – 1st Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care: Dublin, Ireland, 18–21 September 2014, Elsevier, 2014, Vol. 22, no 4, 254-254 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This study covers nurses' job satisfaction during triage at emergency departments in Western Sweden. Method: Data were collected from 74 triage nurses using a questionnaire containing 37 short form open questions. The answers were analysed descriptively and by measuring the covariance. Two open questions were analysed by content analysis. Results: The results showed a high degree of job satisfaction (88%). Triage as a method, the interesting nature of the work, and a certain freedom in connection with the triage tasks contributed to job satisfaction (R2 = 0.40). The nurses found their work interesting and stimulating, although some reported job dissatisfaction due to a heavy workload and lack of competence. Most of the nurses thought that Manchester Triage System (MTS) was a clear and straightforward method but in need of development. One result from the content analysis was difficulties in decision-making during the assessment of patients with multiple diseases. Since this patient group had increased in number, greater demands were placed on the nurses' competence. Conclusions: The rational modelling structure by which the triage method is constructed is unable to distinguish all the parameters that an experienced nurse takes into account. When the model is allowed to take precedence over experience, it can be of hindrance and contribute to certain estimates not corresponding with the patient's needs. The participants requested regular exercises solving and discussing patient scenarios, which can contribute to develop the instrument.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014. Vol. 22, no 4, 254-254 p.
National Category
Nursing Work Sciences
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7206DOI: 10.1016/j.ienj.2014.08.006ISI: 000347098200065OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-7206DiVA: diva2:774161
Conference
1st Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care, 2014
Note

Oral abstract, nummer O18.1.

Available from: 2014-12-22 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2016-02-04Bibliographically approved

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Forsgren, SusanneForsman, BeritCarlström, Eric
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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