Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Perceived mother and father acceptance-rejection predict four unique aspects of child adjustment across nine countries
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC.
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 56, no 8, 923-932 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background It is generally believed that parental rejection of children leads to child maladaptation. However, the specific effects of perceived parental acceptance-rejection on diverse domains of child adjustment and development have been incompletely documented, and whether these effects hold across diverse populations and for mothers and fathers are still open questions. Methods This study assessed children’s perceptions of mother and father acceptance-rejection in 1,247 families from China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States as antecedent predictors of later internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, school performance, prosocial behavior, and social competence. Results Higher perceived parental rejection predicted increases in internalizing and externalizing behavior problems and decreases in school performance and prosocial behavior across 3 years controlling for within-wave relations, stability across waves, and parental age, education, and social desirability bias. Patterns of relations were similar across mothers and fathers and, with a few exceptions, all nine countries. Conclusions Children’s perceptions of maternal and paternal acceptance-rejection have small but nearly universal effects on multiple aspects of their adjustment and development regardless of the family’s country of origin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 56, no 8, 923-932 p.
Keyword [en]
Parental acceptance-rejection, behavior problems, school performance, prosocial behavior, social competence, cross-cultural
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-7119DOI: 10.1111/jcpp.12366ISI: 000357472500011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84936891080OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-7119DiVA: diva2:770603
Note

Article first published online: 10 DEC 201

Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-12-11 Last updated: 2015-10-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sorbring, Emma
By organisation
Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies
In the same journal
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 110 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf