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Don't ask don't tell: Battered Women living in Sweden encounter with healthcare personnel and their experience of the care given
University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy.
University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy.
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3702-8202
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, p. 23166-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years there has been increased intimate partner violence (IPV) toward women. Research on the care provided to victims of IPV is limited. The purpose of the study was to gain a deeper understanding of women's lived experience of IPV and their encounters with healthcare professionals, social workers, and the police following IPV. A phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur was used. The method is based on text interpretation and gives voice to women's lived experience. Twelve women living at a women's shelter in Sweden narrated their IPV experiences. The study revealed that the women experienced retraumatization, uncaring behaviors, and unendurable suffering during their encounter with healthcare professionals. They were disappointed, dismayed, and saddened by the lack of support, care, and empathy. Nurses and other healthcare professionals must understand and detect signs of IPV as well as provide adequate care, as these women are vulnerable. IPV victims need to feel that they can trust healthcare professionals. Lack of trust can lead to less women reporting IPV and seeking help.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 9, p. 23166-
Keywords [en]
nursing, intimate partner violence, emergency, uncaring, suffer
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-6186DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v9.23166ISI: 000331907700001PubMedID: 24576461Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84896946579OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-6186DiVA, id: diva2:716016
Note

Published online Feb 26, 2014

Available from: 2014-05-07 Created: 2014-04-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Dahlborg Lyckhage, Elisabeth

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