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Digitizing work: Organizational Work-Integrated Learning through Technology Mediated Courses in Manufacturing Industry
University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering. (LINA, PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0086-9067
University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Engineering. (LINA, PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0380-1386
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System. (LINA, PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8992-1919
2013 (English)In: 18th WACE World Conference on Cooperative & Work-Integrated Education: WIL-POWER: FUELING THE FUTURE WORKFORCE, WACE , 2013, p. 1-12Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The manufacturing industry is continuously facing global competition and customer demands which impose the need to knowledge development to manage changes and long-term business goals. Continuous and lifelong learning is often seen as processes that support competence development and learning integrated within work. In this paper we focus on processes of learning within the manufacturing industry and how learning initiatives as technology mediated courses (TMC) can support learning from the workplace learning needs. Is learning initiatives integrated in work considered as means for strategic business goals? Can TMC be an important learning tool for support of knowledge creation? The study is performed through interviews with production managers and human resource managers with eight manufacturing industries in the western part of Sweden. Through the study we try to understand what knowledge the industry needs to evolve and achieve effective production. We also study the readiness for technology mediated learning. Early results show that the industries have interest in learning initiatives such as TMC and are willing to co-produce knowledge together with universities. We present a matrix model that interlinks business goals and the industries current use of technology mediated learning tools. However, the experience of using tools such as web conference systems and learning management systems for learning initiatives is diversified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WACE , 2013. p. 1-12
Series
Conference Proceedings Abstracts, ISSN 2152-0518
Keywords [en]
workplace learning, work-integrated learning, technology mediated courses, manufacturing industry, WIL
Keywords [sv]
AIL
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics; Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-5876OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-5876DiVA, id: diva2:685390
Conference
18th WACE World Conference on Cooperative & Work-Integrated Education, June 24-27, 2013, Durban, South Africa
Projects
MERIT - Manufacturing Education and Research with Information Technology
Funder
Knowledge FoundationAvailable from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Co-constructing Expertise: Competence Development through Work-Integrated e-Learning in joint Industry-University Collaboration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-constructing Expertise: Competence Development through Work-Integrated e-Learning in joint Industry-University Collaboration
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis is inter-disciplinary and proceed from the ongoing challenges of the increased digitalization, automation and robotization that impact the manufacturing industry's emergent need of high-qualified practitioners. Digitalization also challenges universities to open up to external collaboration and to design blended e-learning targeting industry knowledge needs. The studies take up on such challenges and explore inter-organizational collaborations and forms of knowledge construction to strengthen engineering competences integrated inwork in a way that enables manufacturing companies to remain effective and to be prepared for future industrial transformations. The objective is to explore how mutual construction of knowledge emerge through learning activities between multiple actors in a joint industry-university collaborative e-learning practice. The empirical setting is a new type of collaborative course concept developed within the project ProdEx. The project comprise a network of industries and one university in a longitudinal design and implementation process of blended and work-integrated e-learning. This initiative was explored with a collaborative action research approach integrated with five studies, from four perspectives, the industry managers, the practitioners, the research teachers and the course unit. Negotiated knotworking, from cultural-historical activity theory, became a central theoretical concept and a working tool to examine how managers, practitioners and research teachers together negotiated production technology knowledge content and e-learning design towards future workplace transformations. This concept was used to further understand how co-construction of knowledge was developing over time into a richer concept. The results contributes to a wider understanding of how co-construction of knowledge in an e-learning design practice was developing into stronger relations between actors and into more stable courses. Real learning cases and digital labs support theory-practical intertwining of mutual learning of active participation between practitioners and ix research teachers. Initial e-learning technology failures and pedagogical mistakes in the courses were easier to overcome, than issues concerning continuous company support for course participation. Matching industry competence needs with university research fields is continuously challenging. Practitioners' aiming for personal continuous competence development on university level created critical and high-qualitative performances and valuable engagement throughout the process of co-construction of knowledge. The knowledge co-construction became a two-way development, pushing research teachers to active involve and consider practitioners' industry experiences concerning learning content, pedagogical strategies and e-learning forms. While earlier research has discussed the problems of crossing boundaries between industry and university, overall findings show that industry and university actors are crossing boundaries when they mutually co-construct knowledge in an elearningpractice. Co-construction of knowledge entail mutual trust, sideways and interactive learning in a collaborative context. The main contribution suggested in the thesis is that co-constructing expertise entail three levels of activities among actors; to have insight into the purposes and practices of others (relational expertise), the capacity to transform the problems of a practice and together build common knowledge (distributed expertise), and finally the capacity of mutually co-construct knowledge acted upon in practice towards work-integrated transformations (co-constructing expertise).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trollhättan: University West, 2018. p. 157
Series
PhD Thesis: University West ; 14
Keywords
Competence Development, e-Learning design, Learning activities, Co-construction, Manufacturing industry, Expert knowledge, Knotworking, Expansive Transformation, Boundary crossing
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Learning
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12022 (URN)978-91-87531-75-0 (ISBN)978-91-87531-76-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-01-16, F104, Trollhättan, 14:47 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-01-25

Open Access in DiVA

Digitizing work(220 kB)71 downloads
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Hattinger, MonikaChristiernin-Gustafsson, LinnEriksson, Kristina M.

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