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Loneliness despite the presence of others: Adolescents’ experiences of having a parent who becomes ill with cancer
NU-Hospital Organisation, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
NU-Hospital Organisation,Department of Pediatrics.
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5705-5705
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 6, 697-703 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AbstractAim The aim of this study was to describe young adults’ own perspectives on the experience of having a parent who developed cancer when the young adult was an adolescent. Method Narrative interviews were conducted with six young adults aged between 20 and 26. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The main message that the young adults communicated in the interviews was interpreted as the overarching theme ‘Loneliness despite the presence of others’. Two domains with three categories each emerged: distance, comprising a feeling of loneliness, lacking the tools to understand, and grief and anger; and closeness, comprising belief in the future, comfort and relief, and a need for support. The young adults felt a loneliness that they had never experienced before, and they lacked the tools to understand the situation. They felt grief and anger over what the cancer had caused. However, they had still managed to regain faith in the future. They found comfort and relief in the thought that this would not necessarily happen to them again, and they gained support from talking to family and friends. Conclusion If all family members are given the same information, it becomes easier to talk about what is happening. This can reduce adolescent children’s experience of loneliness. Contact with health care professionals should be maintained throughout the period of illness. Many short informal contacts create relationships and trust that can be helpful if the worst happens and the parent dies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 17, no 6, 697-703 p.
Keyword [en]
Adolescents, Loneliness, Narrative, Parental cancer, Qualitative content analysis, Young adults
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-5698DOI: 10.1016/j.ejon.2013.09.005ISI: 000328715900002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84888035836OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-5698DiVA: diva2:663383
Note

Available online 31 October 2013

Available from: 2013-11-11 Created: 2013-11-07 Last updated: 2014-10-23Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textScopushttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462388913001026

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CiteExportLink to record
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