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Numerical simulation of Ar-x%CO2 shielding gas and its effect on an electric welding arc
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. (Welding PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2535-8132
Chalmers University of Technology. (Department of Applied Mechanics)
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. (Welding PTW)
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. (Welding PTW)
2011 (English)In: IIW Commission XII Doc. XII-2017-11, 2011, 1-12 p.Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study focuses on the simulation of a plasma arc heat source in the context of electric arc welding. The simulation model was implemented in the open source CFD software OpenFOAM-1.6.x, in three space dimensions, coupling thermal fluid mechanics with electromagnetism. Two approaches were considered for calculating the magnetic field: i) the three-dimensional approach, and ii) the so-called axisymmetric approach. The electromagnetic part of the solver was tested against analytic solution for an infinite electric rod. Perfect agreement was obtained. The complete solver was tested against experimental measurements for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) with an axisymmetric configuration. The shielding gas was argon, and the anode and cathode were treated as boundary conditions. The numerical solutions then depend significantly on the approach used for calculating the magnetic field. The so-called axisymmetric approach indeed neglects the radial current density component, mainly resulting in a poor estimation of the arc velocity. Plasma arc simulations were done for various Ar-x%CO2 shielding gas compositions: pure argon (x=0), pure carbon dioxide (x=100), and mixturesof these two gases with x=1 and 10% in mole. The simulation results clearly show that the presence of carbon dioxide results in thermal arc constriction, and increased maximum arc temperature and velocity. Various boundary conditions were set on the anode and cathode (using argon as shielding gas) to evaluate their influence on the plasma arc. These conditions, difficult to measure and to estimate a priori, significantly affect the heat source simulation results. Solution of the temperature and electromagnetic fields in the anode and cathode will thus be included in the forthcoming developments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. 1-12 p.
Keyword [en]
electric arc welding, electric heat source, thermal plasma, magnetic potential
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-3716OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-3716DiVA: diva2:444079
Conference
IIW Commission XII and SG 212 Intermediate Meeting
Available from: 2011-09-27 Created: 2011-09-27 Last updated: 2016-02-10Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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