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Does sex influence the allocation of life support level by dispatchers in acute chest pain?
University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0575-4309
University College of Borås, Prehospital Research Centre of Western Sweden.
University West.
University West.
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2010 (English)In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 28, no 8, 922-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate (a) the differences between men and women in symptom profile, allocated life support level (LSL), and presence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), life-threatening condition (LTC), or death and (b) whether a computer-based decision support system could improve the allocation of LSL. PATIENTS: All patients in Göteborg, Sweden, who called the dispatch center because of chest pain during 3 months (n = 503) were included in this study. METHODS: Age, sex, and symptom profile were background variables. Based on these, we studied allocation of LSL by the dispatchers and its relationship to AMI, LTC, and death. All evaluations were made from a sex perspective. Finally, we studied the potential benefit of using a statistical model for allocating LSL. RESULTS: The advanced life support level (ALSL) was used equally frequently for men and women. There was no difference in age or symptom profile between men and women in relation to allocation. However, the allocation of ALSL was predictive of AMI and LTC only in men. The sensitivity was far lower for women than for men. When a statistical model was used for allocation, the ALSL was predictive for both men and women. Using a separate model for men and women respectively, sensitivity increased, especially for women, and specificity was kept at the same level. CONCLUSION: This exploratory study indicates that women would benefit most from the allocation of LSL using a statistical model and computer-based decision support among patients who call for an ambulance because of acute chest pain. This needs further evaluation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA: Saunders , 2010. Vol. 28, no 8, 922-7 p.
Keyword [en]
Acute chest pain, sex, life support level
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2752DOI: 10.1016/j.ajem.2009.05.009PubMedID: 20825925OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-2752DiVA: diva2:357825
Available from: 2010-10-20 Created: 2010-10-20 Last updated: 2015-09-15Bibliographically approved

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