Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A kinetic study in adults with food hypersensitivity assessed as eosinophil activation in fecal samples
University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0575-4309
Show others and affiliations
2003 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 33, no 8, 1052-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Immune-mediated food hypersensitivity affecting the gut is difficult to evaluate, and objective tools to diagnose local gastrointestinal (GI) inflammatory reactions are lacking. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether allergic manifestations in adults with a history of food-related GI symptoms could be assessed in feces during symptomatic and non-symptomatic periods, using the surrogate markers, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil protein X (EPX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). METHODS: Thirteen subjects with food hypersensitivity-related GI symptoms, confirmed by a positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC), were subjected to an open kinetic food challenge design for 6 weeks. Symptoms were recorded and scored during the 3-week study period and stool samples were obtained every day. The surrogate markers ECP, EPX and MPO were measured in the supernatants from feces samples. RESULTS: A significant increase in abdominal pain, distension and flatulence was observed during challenge, with a gradual decrease during elimination diet. Both between days and subjects, EPX levels were more frequently increased compared to ECP and MPO. Individuals with a history of a short duration of symptoms had significantly higher mean levels of EPX and MPO than those with a longer duration of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: An overall increase in levels of eosinophil markers, in particular EPX, was observed in feces from patients with food-related GI symptoms. However, rather than being a tool to differentiate symptomatic from non-symptomatic periods, EPX might be used for detecting an ongoing clinical or subclinical chronic inflammation, that may have an impact on the patient's clinical course of GI symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 33, no 8, 1052-9 p.
Keyword [en]
eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil protein X, fecal samples, food-induced gastrointestinal
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2767DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2222.2003.01725.xPubMedID: 12911778OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-2767DiVA: diva2:357817
Available from: 2010-10-20 Created: 2010-10-20 Last updated: 2015-09-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gellerstedt, Martin
By organisation
Division of Computer Science and Informatics
In the same journal
Clinical and Experimental Allergy
Information Systems, Social aspectsNursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 88 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf