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Clinical factors of importance for outcome after lumbar disc herniation surgery: long-term follow-up.
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2010 (English)In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1459-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Factors as age, sex, smoking, duration of leg pain, working status, type/level of disc herniation and psychosocial factors have been demonstrated to be of importance for short-term results after lumbar discectomy. There are few studies with long-term follow-up. In this prospective study of lumbar disc herniation patients undergoing surgery, the result was evaluated at 2 and 5-10 (mean 7.3) years after surgery. Predictive factors for satisfaction with treatment and objective outcome were investigated. Out of the included 171 patients undergoing lumbar discectomy, 154 (90%) patients completed the 2-year follow-up and 140 (81%) completed the long-term follow-up. Baseline data and questionnaires about leg- and back pain intensity (VAS), duration of leg pain, disability (Oswestry Disability Index), depression (Zung Depression Scale), sick leave and employment status were obtained preoperatively, at 2-year- and long-term follow-up. Primary outcome included patient satisfaction with treatment (at both time points) and assessment of an independent observer at the 2-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes at 2-year follow-up were improvement of leg and back pain, working capacity and the need for analgesics or sleeping pills. In about 70% of the patients excellent or good overall result was reported at both follow-ups, with subjective outcome measurements. The objective evaluation after 2 years was in agreement with this result. Time on sick leave was found to be a clinically important predictor of the primary outcomes, with a potential of changing the probability of a satisfactory outcome (both objective and subjective) from around 50% (sick leave >3 months) to 80% (sick leave <2 months). Time on sick leave was also an important predictor for several of the secondary outcomes; e.g. working capacity and the need for analgesics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer , 2010. Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1459-67
Keywords [en]
Clinical outcome; Disc herniation; Long-term follow-up; Predictive factor; Surgery
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2754DOI: 10.1007/s00586-010-1433-7PubMedID: 20512513OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-2754DiVA, id: diva2:357814
Available from: 2010-10-20 Created: 2010-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Gellerstedt, Martin

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