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Disturbed sleep, fatigue, anxiety and depression in myocardial infarction patients
NU Hospital group, Department of Internal Medicine.
Astra Zeneca R&D, Mölndal.
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1673-6288
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7804-0342
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 9, no 3, 175-180 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Disturbed sleep has been linked to increased morbidity, mortality and depression and worsened health-related quality of life in patients with chronic illness. Few studies of readjustment after coronary artery disease have explicitly focused on sleep disturbance. Aim: To explore associations between disturbed sleep, fatigue, anxiety and depression, and to assess to what extent fatigue four months post-MI could be explained. Method: The sample included 204 consecutive patients, ≤ 80 years of age who answered questionnaires about disturbed sleep, fatigue, anxiety and depression four months after MI. Results: The variables anxiety, depression and disturbed sleep were all associated with fatigue. The regression model accounted for 46% of the variance in fatigue with depression and disturbed sleep as predictors. Infarct size measured by conventional biochemical markers, left ventricle ejection fraction and history of previous MI were not correlated with disturbed sleep, fatigue, anxiety or depression. Conclusions: From knowledge about associations between disturbed sleep, fatigue, anxiety and depression after MI, cardiac nurses could be trained to observe such symptoms. Optimal care for sleep disturbance may include actions to reduce anxiety and depression as well as self-care advices about sleep hygiene in order to improve sleep quality and reduce fatigue. © 2009 European Society of Cardiology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 9, no 3, 175-180 p.
Keyword [en]
Anxiety, Depression, Disturbed sleep, Fatigue, Myocardial infarction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2641DOI: 10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2009.12.003ISBN: 14745151 (ISSN) OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-2641DiVA: diva2:347882
Available from: 2010-09-03 Created: 2010-09-03 Last updated: 2016-11-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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