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Simulation of robotic TIG-welding
University West, Department of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4329-418X
2003 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Lund Institute of Technology , 2003. , p. 96
Series
Department of mechanical engineering, Lund Insititute of Technology
Keywords [en]
Robotics
Keywords [sv]
Bågsvetsning, robotteknik
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2565ISBN: 91-628-5702-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-2565DiVA, id: diva2:326264
Available from: 2010-06-23 Created: 2010-06-22 Last updated: 2014-05-08Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Three Dimensional Simulation of Robot path, Heat Transfer and Residual Stresses of a TIG-welded Part with Complex Geometry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three Dimensional Simulation of Robot path, Heat Transfer and Residual Stresses of a TIG-welded Part with Complex Geometry
2002 (English)In: Trends in Welding Research: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference: Phoenix, AZ, 15-19 April, 2002, 2002, p. 973-978Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper a system is presented that combines a robot off-line programming software with a finite element model that predicts temperature-time histories and residual stress distributions. The objective is to develop a tool for the engineer where robot trajectories and welding process parameters can be optimized on parts with complex geometry. The system was evaluated on a stainless steel gas turbine component. Robot weld paths were defined off-line and automatically downloaded to the finite element program, where transient temperatures and residual stresses were predicted. Temperature dependent properties and phase change, were included in the analysis. Assumptions and principles behind the modeling techniques are presented together with predicted temperature histories, residual stresses, and fixture forces.

Keywords
Computer aided design; Computer aided manufacturing; Computer simulation; Computer software; Computer systems; Finite element method; Gas turbines; Heat transfer; Optimization; Residual stresses; Robot programming; Stainless steel
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2483 (URN)
Available from: 2010-05-21 Created: 2010-05-21 Last updated: 2015-03-17Bibliographically approved
2. Three-dimensional simulation of robot path and heat transfer of a TIG-welded part with complex geometry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three-dimensional simulation of robot path and heat transfer of a TIG-welded part with complex geometry
2002 (English)In: 11th International Conferences on Computer Technology in Welding: Colombus, Ohio December 6-7, 2001, 2002, p. 309-316Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The application of commercial software (OLP) packages for robot simulation, and programming, use interactive computer graphics, provide powerful tools for creating welding paths off-line. By the use of such software, problems of robot reach, accessibility, collision and timing can be eliminated during the planning stage. This paper describes how such software can be integrated with a numerical model that predicts temperature-time histories in the solid material. The objective of this integration is to develop a tool for the engineer where robot trajectories and process parameters can be optimized on parts with complex geometry. Such a tool would decrease the number of weld trials, increase productivity and reduce costs. Assumptions and principles behind the modeling techniques are presented together with experimental evaluation of the correlation between modeled and measured temperatures.

Series
Technical Paper - Society of Manufacturing Engineers, ISSN 0361-8765 ; AD02-292
Keywords
Finite element analysis; Heat transfer; Off-line programming; Welding
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2482 (URN)
Conference
11th International Conferences on Computer Technology in Welding, Colombus, Ohio December 6-7, 2001
Available from: 2010-05-21 Created: 2010-05-21 Last updated: 2016-02-12Bibliographically approved
3. Non-contact Temperature Measurements using an Infrared Camera in Aerospace Welding Applications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-contact Temperature Measurements using an Infrared Camera in Aerospace Welding Applications
2002 (English)In: 6th International Conference on Trends in Welding Research: Phoenix, AZ; 15-19 April 2002, Materials Park: ASM International , 2002, p. 930-935Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the application of infrared (IR) thermal imaging and temperature measurements in welding applications, both on single plane plates and on an aero engine turbine component with complex geometry. Temperature profiles were measured on the plates using thermocouples (T/C) in combination with an IR camera system, and the results were compared. The IR camera was used both in line scan mode (270 Hz scan frequency) and in full frame mode (1 Hz frame rate). Different methods of surface treatments have been tested to handle the problem of the surface emissivity variations due to oxidation during welding. Results from measurements using thermocouples and IR camera is presented in the paper as well as temperature measurements using the IR camera on an turbine exhaust case (TEC) engine component.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Materials Park: ASM International, 2002
Keywords
Engineering controlled terms, aerospace applications, cameras, computer simulation, high temperature effects, infrared devices, infrared radiation, oxidation, surface treatment, temperature measurement, thermocouples, turbines
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2495 (URN)
Available from: 2010-05-31 Created: 2010-05-31 Last updated: 2014-05-08Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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