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The relationship between long-term job strain and morning and evening saliva cortisol secretion among white-collar workers.
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7428-469X
University of Surrey, Guildford.
University of Surrey, Guildford.
University of Surrey, Guildford.
2008 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, ISSN 1076-8998, Vol. 13, no 2, 105-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to assess long-term job strain impact on morning and evening salivary cortisol secretion. In all 77 white-collar workers (31% women; sample mean age, 42 years at baseline) volunteered to sample morning (immediately after waking up) and evening (10 p.m.) salivary cortisol for 7 consecutive days. By median split on aggregated self-reported isostrain from three consecutive questionnaires distributed in a period of approximately 3.5 years the participants were classified into a high or low long-term isostrain condition. Regardless of strain condition, there was a significant reduction in morning salivary cortisol secretion from the working week to the weekend, whereas evening salivary cortisol secretion showed no significant variation during the week. Although chronic isostrain did not affect the morning saliva cortisol measures, evening cortisol secretion was significantly elevated in the chronic high isostrain group throughout the whole week. The elevated evening cortisol measures associated with chronic high strain are concordant with the findings in other studies on long-term strain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 13, no 2, 105-13 p.
Keyword [en]
chronic job strain, morning salivary cortisol, evening salivary cortisol
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social science, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-1735DOI: 10.1037/1076-8998.13.2.105PubMedID: 18393580OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-1735DiVA: diva2:241227
Available from: 2009-10-01 Created: 2009-10-01 Last updated: 2015-12-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • vancouver
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  • de-DE
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