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The use of Virtual Reality for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents in a paediatric oncology unit
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit.
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit.
Jönköping University, School of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing Science.
2009 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 102-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: It is essential to minimize pain and distress during painful procedures in children. This studyexamined the effect of using non-immersive Virtual Reality (VR) during a needle-related procedure onreported pain or distress of children and adolescents in a paediatric oncology unit and surveyed their response to the use of VR-equipment during the procedure.Method: Twenty-one children and adolescents were included in an intervention group with nonimmersiveVR and another 21 children and adolescents in a control group where they underwent either venous punctures or subcutaneous venous port devices. Self-reported pain and distress, heart rate andobservational pain scores were collected before, during and after the procedures. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in conjunction with the completed intervention.Results: Self-reported and observed pain and distress scores were low and few significant differences of quantitative data between the groups were found. Two themes emerged in the analysis of the interviews; the VR game should correspond to the child and the medical procedure and children enjoyed the VR game and found that it did distract them during the procedure.Conclusion: The interviews showed that non-immersive VR is a positive experience for children undergoing a minor procedure such as venous puncture or a subcutaneous venous port access.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 13, no 2, p. 102-109
Keywords [en]
Childhood cancer, Distraction, Nursing, Pain management
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-1686DOI: 10.1016/j.ejon.2009.01.003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-1686DiVA, id: diva2:240382
Available from: 2009-09-28 Created: 2009-09-25 Last updated: 2016-02-05Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • Other style
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