Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
When it becomes a diagnosis: a study of professionals’ work after Internet Gaming Disorder, IGD, becomes a diagnosis
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7881-5670
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Today various professionals’ work involves diagnosing children and youth. This affects children and youth in different ways, among them, their performance in school. A new diagnosis can be both positive and negative. Those who support a diagnosis claim that without one, it is difficult to help people with problems or do research. But a negative aspect can be that people who receive a diagnosis can be stigmatised and suffer from lower self-esteem.

In 2018, the World Health Organisation put out a statement clarifying that too much gaming would now be classified as Internet Gaming Disorder. 87 % of Swedish children aged 9-12 play different games on the Internet or in other settings every day. Excessive gaming has long been discussed and can be seen as a problem in itself or as a problem related to something else. There is not much research into gaming disorder and with this new diagnosis more knowledge is required.

The purpose of this study is to interview different professional groups who work with children and youths: student health professionals (e.g. school nurses), social services (e.g. family support) and child psychiatry. The aim is to gain more knowledge about how these professionals’ work changes when a new diagnosis is classified. What do they learn and how do they collaborate? Another aim is to study which approach they take in regard to children’s agency after a new diagnosis. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
internet gaming disorders, diagnosis
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14741OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-14741DiVA, id: diva2:1375867
Conference
Narrowing paths – transgressive routes Youth in changing times:new forms of inequality,risk and resistance,Nordic Youth Research Symposium (NYRIS) in Aarhus 14 - 16 August 2019
Available from: 2019-12-06 Created: 2019-12-06 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(72 kB)3 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 72 kBChecksum SHA-512
5b8ebc6d0cfa2a02f9a2180085e777a123132dba79897839d697f4670721a30c975355ede0a1f357afff01a872bb30dc0e365e512d11a4ace339957333579d1e
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Gurdal, Sevtap

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gurdal, Sevtap
By organisation
Division for Educational Science and Languages
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 3 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 29 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf