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Education and Parenting in Sweden
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7881-5670
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3328-6538
2019 (English)In: School Systems, Parent Behavior, and Academic Achievement: An International Perspective / [ed] Sorbring, Emma; Lansford, Jennifer E., Springer, 2019, p. 95-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Swedish children's rights to school and a childhood were discussed as early as 1900 and today nearly all (99.9%) Swedish children from the age of six attend comprehensive school for ten years. Comprehensive school, both private and public, is free of charge and compulsory for everyone. In general, Sweden is described as a country where young people are perceived as individuals with agency, both in the family and in school. It is expected that students should be treated with respect and taught about their rights and how to practice them. Teachers are supposed to encourage young people's agency by, for example, letting them take responsibility and be involved in decisions about the school work and their lives. This is related to the goal of teaching young people more about how to become citizens and about democratic values in society. Although Swedish schools have a high interest in students' own agency and their mental health, politics put pressure on the schools to achieve higher academic success among students. This chapter presents the current Swedish education system and its challenges when it comes to maintaining high values concerning students' mental health and, simultaneously, striving for better academic results, focusing particularly on families belonging to the lower socioeconomic class and with a migration background.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. p. 95-109
Series
Young People and Learning Processes in School and Everyday Life, ISSN 2522-5642, E-ISSN 2522-5650 ; Vol 3
Keywords [en]
Childhood, education, Sweden
National Category
Pedagogical Work Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Child and Youth studies; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Educational science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14430DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-28277-6_8ISBN: 978-3-030-28277-6 (print)ISBN: 978-3-030-28277-6 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-14430DiVA, id: diva2:1353620
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved

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Gurdal, SevtapSorbring, Emma

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Citation style
  • apa
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Output format
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