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The shift in the United States' attitude towards the Taliban in Afghanistan
University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This bachelor's thesis investigates the gradual shift in attitude of the U.S.A towards the Taliban in Afghanistan. The aim of the study is to see if there have been any changes in U.S. behavior by focusing on how U.S. governmental documentation is framed. The study applies a longitudinal case study design where role theory, and its important concepts, and framing theory are used. This paper uses primary material that was published in country reports on terrorism in Afghanistan between 2007 and 2017 by the U.S. Department of State. Thus, this thesis employs a qualitative content analysis to analyze data collection through an in-depth method of frame expression of the role strain and role conflict, with indicators of "AbsolutistTerrorists" and "Traditional Terrorist". The findings indicate that the U.S. attitude developed from identifying the Taliban as "absolutist terrorists" to becoming "traditional terrorists" over a period of time. The U.S. perception of the Taliban changed from it being a non-negotiable organization to a negotiable group, from a global terrorist group with aims of religious fanaticism, to being a more nationalist movement which focuses on its territorial autonomy, and from being an extreme terrorist group to a less extreme terrorist group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 46
Keywords [en]
U.S., Taliban, Absolutist terrorists, Traditional terrorists, Role theory, Role strain, Role Conflict and Framing theory
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14184Local ID: EIS501OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-14184DiVA, id: diva2:1338812
Subject / course
Political science
Educational program
International Programme in Politics and Economics
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-24 Last updated: 2019-07-25Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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