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Health-related lifestyle and perceived health among people with severe mental illness: Gender differences and degree of sense of coherence.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad, Sweden.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad, Sweden.
University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5705-5705
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 82-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People with severe mental illness (SMI) experience an increased risk of physical ill health and premature death, which appears to be partly related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of health-related lifestyle habits and perceived health among people with severe mental illness. A further aim was to explore if there were any gender differences or differences based on degree of sense of coherence. The study adopted a cross-sectional design based on data from 65 people with SMI. The results show that degree of Sense of Coherence (SOC) does have relevance for perceived health and for dimensions of Quality of Life (QOL). Furthermore, among the participants with strong SOC, there were less daily smokers and they seemed to have less sedentary leisure time than those with low SOC. Men reported more anxiety/depression than women and women ate fruit more often than men, otherwise there were no gender differences. In comparison with the general population, people with SMI show a higher Body Mass Index are more sedentary, more often daily smokers, have lower SOC and perceive a lower QOL. This emphasizes the importance of health-promotion support that focuses on lifestyle changes, and support for strengthening SOC and QOL for people with SMI. © 2018 Elsevier Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 33, no 2, p. 82-188
Keywords [en]
Mental illness, health
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13432DOI: 10.1016/j.apnu.2018.12.002ISI: 000466833600008PubMedID: 30927988Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85059175396OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-13432DiVA, id: diva2:1297970
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved

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