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Children's agency in parent-child, teacher-pupil and peer relationship contexts.
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7881-5670
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3328-6538
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup1, article id 1565239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine children's perception of their agency in different relationship contexts. Historically, most studies conducted in Sweden concerning children's agency, in relation to their self-efficacy and perceptions of their effectiveness as agents, have been carried out in school situations or other institutional organizations. Past research has shown that children'sagency has positive links to health, school achievement and/or adjustment. Method: Interviews were conducted with 103 10-year-old Swedish children to examine three relationship contexts: parent-child, teacher-pupil, and peer relations. Vignettes about the different contexts were presented to the children and their answers were analysed with thematic analysis. Results: The results show that children think of their agency differently depending upon which relationship context they find themselves in. Most perceived agency are found insituations with peers, and children perceive they have the least agency with teachers. In situations with parents, children think they would react with more resistance than with peers and teachers. It is mainly with other children that they would show assertiveness and try to find asolution together, while they would be more emotional and perceive less power with adults. Conclusion: We conclude that children make adistinction in their perception of agency depending upon the relationship context. These findings can be relevant for helping children receive more agency in all contexts, which might have apositive impact on health and adjustment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 13, no sup1, article id 1565239
Keywords [en]
Agency, parent relationship, peer relationships, teacher relationship, well-being
National Category
Pedagogical Work Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13472DOI: 10.1080/17482631.2019.1565239ISI: 000459729600014PubMedID: 30709328Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85060905831OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-13472DiVA, id: diva2:1285463
Note

Published online: 01 Feb 2019

Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved

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Gurdal, SevtapSorbring, Emma

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