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Whole-body bone mineral measurements in 15-year-old Swedish adolescents.
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1999 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 106-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bone mineral area (BA), total bone mineral content (TBMC) and total bone mineral density (TBMD) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 396 randomly selected, healthy 15-year-old Swedish boys and girls. The influence of body size, pubertal development, physical activity level (PAL), total energy expenditure (TEE), dietary intake of energy, calcium and vitamin D, and alcohol and smoking habits on TBMC and TBMD were examined in bi- and multivariate analyses. In bivariate analyses BA, TBMC and TBMD showed strong correlations with weight, height and TEE in both sexes. In boys but not in girls these bone variables were significantly correlated with dietary intakes of energy, calcium and vitamin D. No significant correlations were found between PAL and the three bone variables. In multivariate analyses with TBMC as dependent variable BA, height, weight and Tanner stages explained 88% and 87% of the variance in boys and girls respectively. In similar analyses with TBMD as dependent variable the corresponding figures were 50% and 54%. The major part of the variance in all these models was explained by BA, and only a few percent by all the other independent variables. No significant reduction was found when TEE or daily intakes of calcium or vitamin D were introduced into the models. These results illustrate the importance of including BA, weight and height as independent variables in regression models of TBMC to avoid spurious associations with other variables in the analyses. The results may also indicate that in normal Swedish adolescents environmental factors such as dietary intake of nutrients play a minor role as determinants of bone mineralization. High levels of physical activity and bone mineral measures possibly explain the lack of significant correlations between these variables and do not imply a lack of association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999. Vol. 9, no 2, p. 106-14
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13317DOI: 10.1007/s001980050122PubMedID: 10367036OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-13317DiVA, id: diva2:1273789
Note

Professor Gösta Samuelson samlade trycksaker; 181

Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved

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