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An exploratory study of long-haul truck drivers' secondary tasks and reasons for performing them.
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
Volvo Group Trucks Technology, Human Behaviour and Perception, M1.6, Götaverksgatan 10, SE-405 08 Göteborg, Sweden.
Volvo Group Trucks Technology, Product Design, ABN, Götaverksgatan 10, SE-405 08 Göteborg, Sweden.
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. (LINA)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8562-5610
2018 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 117, p. 154-163, article id S0001-4575(18)30149-0Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on drivers has shown how certain visual-manual secondary tasks, unrelated to driving, increase the risk of being involved in crashes. The purpose of the study was to investigate (1) if long-haul truck drivers in Sweden engage in secondary tasks while driving, what tasks are performed and how frequently, (2) the drivers' self-perceived reason/s for performing them, and (3) if psychological factors might reveal reasons for their engaging in secondary tasks. The study comprised 13 long-haul truck drivers and was conducted through observations, interviews, and questionnaires. The drivers performed secondary tasks, such as work environment related "necessities" (e.g., getting food and/or beverages from the refrigerator/bag, eating, drinking, removing a jacket, face rubbing, and adjusting the seat), interacting with a mobile phone/in-truck technology, and doing administrative tasks. The long-haul truck drivers feel bored and use secondary tasks as a coping strategy to alleviate boredom/drowsiness, and for social interaction. The higher number of performed secondary tasks could be explained by lower age, shorter driver experience, less openness to experience, lower honesty-humility, lower perceived stress, lower workload, and by higher health-related quality of life. These explanatory results may serve as a starting point for further studies on large samples to develop a safer and healthier environment for long-haul truck drivers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 117, p. 154-163, article id S0001-4575(18)30149-0
Keywords [en]
Health-related quality of life, Long-haul truck drivers, Perceived stress, Personality traits, Secondary tasks, Workload
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12273DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2018.04.010ISI: 000436888400017PubMedID: 29702333Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85046157794OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-12273DiVA, id: diva2:1202778
Available from: 2018-04-30 Created: 2018-04-30 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved

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Dåderman, Anna Maria

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