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Managing sustainable use of antibiotics: the role of trust
University of Gothenburg, Department of Political Science, P.O. Box 711, SE 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
University of Gothenburg, Department of Political Science, P.O. Box 711, SE 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human overuse of antibiotics is the main driver of antibiotic resistance. Thus, more knowledge about factors that promote sustainable antibiotic use is urgently needed. Based upon findings from the management of other sustainability and collective action dilemmas, we hypothesize that interpersonal trust is crucial for people’s propensity to cooperate for the common objective. The aim of this article is to further our understanding of people’s antibiotic consumption by investigating if individuals’ willingness to voluntarily abstain from antibiotic use is linked to interpersonal trust. To fulfill the aim, we implement two empirical investigations. In the first part, we use cross-section survey data to investigate the link between interpersonal trust and willingness to abstain from using antibiotics. The second part is based on a survey experiment in which we study the indirect effect of trust on willingness to abstain from using antibiotics by experimentally manipulating the proclaimed trustworthiness of other people to abstain from antibiotics. We find that interpersonal trust is linked to abstemiousness, also when controlling for potential confounders. The survey experiment demonstrates that trustworthiness stimulates individuals to abstain from using antibiotics. In conclusion, trust is an important asset for preserving effective antibiotics for future generations, as well as for reaching many of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. © 2018 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG , 2018. Vol. 10, no 1, article id 143
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12013DOI: 10.3390/su10010143Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85040164050OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-12013DiVA, id: diva2:1178703
Note

(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trust Management: Key Factor of the Sustainable Organizations Embedded in Network)                 

Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved

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Rönnerstrand, Björn

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