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Some Bright And Dark Sides Of Personality May Be Adaptive For Well-Being In Face Of Workplace Bullying
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8562-5610
(Gdansk University of Technology, Poland)
2017 (English)In: Enabling Change Through Work and Organizational Psychology : Opportunities and Challenges for Research and Practice, Dublin, Irland, 2017, Th-OR-S36-2Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose Targets of workplace bullying tend to have poor health, and we set out to determine whether personality may predict their health quality. 

Design/Methodology We collected data from 172 people (98 women); social workers, engineers and restaurant employees. To measure health, we used parts of EQ-5D (usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression), and EQ VAS, a visual analogue scale. Bright (Big-Six) and dark (Machiavellianism, subclinical psychopathy, and narcissism) personality traits were measured by MiniIPIP6 and Short-D3. NAQ-R was used to determine who feel bullied. The relationships of the traits and bullying with health (outcome) were analyzed using 3-step hierarchical linear regressions, controlling for gender, age and social desirability.

Results In face of workplace bullying low extraversion, humility-sincerity and low narcissism significantly predicted poor health related to both discomfort and usual activities. Separate regression models regarding both bright and dark sides of personality predicting depression/anxiety became non-significant when NAQ-R was entered.

Limitations Cross-sectional design and Swedish population.

Research/Practical Implications These results imply that high extraversion and narcissism may protect aspects of health important for working life in face of workplace bullying, while low levels of these traits make a target’s health more sensitive. 

Originality/Value The study is the first to analyze different dimensions of health quality with predictors of both bright and dark personality in face of workplace bullying, discussing the results in the light of Hobfoll’s COR theory and evolution theory. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dublin, Irland, 2017. Th-OR-S36-2
Keyword [en]
Workplace bullying, personality, health-related quality of life
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10938OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-10938DiVA: diva2:1095770
Conference
EAWOP: The 18th congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology. May 17 to May 20, 2017, Dublin 4, Ireland.
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2017-05-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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