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A novel arc heat treatment technique for producing graded microstructures through controlled temperature gradients
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology. (PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6242-3517
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology. (PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8822-2705
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology. (PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0234-3168
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology. (PTW)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2535-8132
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2017 (English)In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 121, no May, 11-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper introduces a novel arc heat treatment technique to produce samples with graded microstructures through the application of controlled temperature gradients. Steady state temperature distributions within the sample can be achieved and maintained, for times ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The technique reduces the number of samples needed to characterize the response of a material to thermal treatments, and can consequently be used as a physical simulator for materials processing. The technique is suitable for conventional heat treatment analogues, welding simulations, multi-step heat treatments, and heat treatments with controlled heating and cooling rates. To demonstrate this technique, a super duplex stainless steel was treated with a stationary TIG arc, to confirm the relationship between generated steady-state temperature fields, microstructure development, hardness, and sensitization to corrosion. Metallographic imaging and hardness mapping provided information about graded microstructures, confirming the formation of secondary phases and microstructure sensitization in the temperature range 850–950 °C. Modelling of temperature distributions and thermodynamic calculations of phase stabilities were used to simulate microstructure development and associated welding cycles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reigate, Surrey: Scientific and technical P. , 2017. Vol. 121, no May, 11-23 p.
Keyword [en]
Stationary arc, Heat treatment, Graded microstructure, Super duplex stainless steels, Physical simulation, Welding
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering; Production Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10760DOI: 10.1016/j.matdes.2017.02.042ISI: :000399625000002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-10760DiVA: diva2:1077581
Available from: 2017-02-28 Created: 2017-02-28 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved

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Hosseini, VahidKarlsson, LeifHurtig, KjellChoquet, IsabelleKumara, Chamara
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