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Who is the victim?: A descriptive single case study of the United Nations’ construction of the sex trafficking victim
University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This thesis is a descriptive single case study where the construction of the sex trafficking victims by the UN is analysed. More specifically, the study examines the construction of the actual victim and non-victim through the theoretical assumptions of masculinity and femininity. It asks 1) How does femininity and masculinity contribute to the construction of the actual victim by the UN? and 2) How does femininity and masculinity contribute to the construction of the non-victim by the UN? Making it possible to draw conclusions about the "ideal victim" of sex trafficking. Through the use of qualitative content analysis, we look at how the UN uses feminine and masculine assumptions in the construction of sex trafficking victim. The findings indicate that the UN uses more feminine assumption when describing the actual victim and masculine assumptions when describing the non-victim. Hence, supporting the construction of "ideal victim" being a woman. As the UN is a significant actor on the field of trafficking issue, the assumptions and ideas it spreads through its documents and media campaigns, has a significant affect to other actors in the field, IOs, IGOs, NGOs and governments, thus spreading the socially constructed gender stereotypes of the female victim and male predator.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 54 p.
Keyword [en]
Gender, human trafficking, sex trafficking, the UN, victim
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10483Local ID: EIS501OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-10483DiVA: diva2:1061647
Subject / course
Political science
Educational program
IPPE
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-01-04 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2017-01-04Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf