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Nanostructure diffraction analysis of a copper/single walled carbon nanotube nanocomposite synthesized by Laser Surface Implanting
University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. North Carolina State University, Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Raleigh, United States. (PTW)
North Carolina State University, Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Raleigh, United States.
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, Department of Material Science and Engineering,United States.
North Carolina State University, Department of Chemistry, Raleigh, United State.
2017 (English)In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 113, 1-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new wet process, denoted as Laser Surface Implanting (LSI), has been developed to synthesize a Copper-Single Wall Carbon NanoTube (Cu-SWCNT) metal nanocomposite by dispersing SWCNTs into molten copper, followed by rapid and non-equilibrium solidification to form the Cu-SWCNT nanocomposite such that dispersed SWCNTs could locked in positions without agglomerating into large clusters. However, the nanometer sizes of the SWCNT clusters inside this nanocomposite make it extremely difficult to obtain TEM images with discernable SWCNT clusters in the copper matrix. In this paper, TEM images and their diffraction patterns for annealed pure copper, quenched pure copper (by the same synthesis process without introducing SWCNTs), and Cu-SWCNT nanocomposite are compared. It is concluded that TEM images with discernable SWCNT clusters are rare. Therefore, diffraction patterns are better tools to identify SWCNTs within the copper matrix. The indexed diffraction patterns confirm that the copper fcc lattice is preserved. However, the Cu-SWCNT nanocomposite samples also exhibit ordered diffuse scattering, consisting of at least two polyhedra of diffuse-scattering bounded by the 110* and 200* family of reciprocal lattice planes, respectively. In addition several samples exhibit super-lattice Bragg diffraction indicative expanded unit cells. It thus appears that the SWCNTs are incorporated into the Cu matrix with precise arrangements commensurate with specific Cu lattice planes. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 113, 1-9 p.
Keyword [en]
Carbon nanotubes; Diffraction; Diffraction patterns; Interferometry; Metallic matrix composites; Nanocomposites; Nanotubes; Shotcreting; Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN); Yarn, Bragg diffraction; Carbon nanotube nanocomposites; Diffraction analysis; Diffuse scattering; Metal nanocomposites; Nanocomposite samples; Non-equilibrium solidification; Synthesis process, Copper
National Category
Materials Chemistry Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering; Production Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-10274DOI: 10.1016/j.carbon.2016.11.004ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84995757400OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-10274DiVA: diva2:1057220
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2016-12-19Bibliographically approved

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Tu, Juei-feng
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Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing
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