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An inquiry into the influence of clinical nursing supervision: Nurses’ professional ethics and experiences of well-being, focusing on the psychosocial work environment
2006 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stavanger, Norge: Stavanger universitet , 2006. , p. 117
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2033ISBN: 82-7644-276-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-2033DiVA, id: diva2:280314
Public defence
(English)
Available from: 2010-03-29 Created: 2009-12-09 Last updated: 2010-03-29Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Australian clinical nurse supervisors' ethical decision-making style
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Australian clinical nurse supervisors' ethical decision-making style
2002 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 4, no 1-2, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores clinical nurse supervisors' ethical styles with regard to supervision in healthcare. Eighty-six registered nurses, all with experience of supervising clinical nurses and students in nursing, completed a specifically designed questionnaire. A qualitative interpretative content analysis identified three core themes: (i) 'Is it safe?'; (ii) 'Is it right?'; and (iii) 'Is it kind?', describing the clinical nurse supervisors' ethical styles. The first core theme 'Is it safe?' covered the supervisors' rules, codes and values that guide their supervisory actions, as well as two sub-themes: (i) empowerment and (ii) integrity. The second core theme 'Is it right?' described the supervisors' responsibility and advocacy as well as the ethical dilemmas experienced in the supervisory process. The third core theme 'Is it kind?' included the supervisors' relationships with patients, professionals and supervisees. The results demonstrate the value of offering a support system, such as clinical supervision, which helps nurses to explore their professional identity for the benefit of the patients.

Keywords
clinical nurse supervisor style, ethical decision-making, responsibility, shortcoming
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing and public health science , Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-1768 (URN)10.1046/j.1442-2018.2002.00096.x (DOI)12087989 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-10-06 Created: 2009-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
2. Nurses' reflections on episodes occurring during their provision of care: an interview study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' reflections on episodes occurring during their provision of care: an interview study
2001 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 71-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate nurses' reflections and interpretations regarding their provision of care, through interviews (N 46), using a hermeneutic method of analysis. Nurses work in a milieu that has undergone constant changes such as, in organisation, decreased number of staff, and with patients demanding more advanced care. The care provided, based on the nurses' narrated episodes were interpreted as two main aspects: interpersonal oriented aspects and task oriented aspects. The subaspects were identified as 'nurse-patient relationship', 'ability to understand the patients' suffering' and 'taking responsibility'.

Keywords
Nurses, Reflection, Interpersonal aspects, Task oriented aspects, Relationship, Hermeneutic method
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-2316 (URN)10.1016/S0020-7489(00)00060-2 (DOI)11137725 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-03-29 Created: 2010-03-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
3. Australian nurse supervisors' styles and their perceptions of ethical dilemmas within health care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Australian nurse supervisors' styles and their perceptions of ethical dilemmas within health care
2003 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 6-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To examine clinical nurse supervisors' styles, in terms of models, organization, focus on supervision and theories used in supervision, as well as their perceptions of ethical dilemmas within health care. BACKGROUND: The importance of clinical supervision in clinical practice has been reported. However, literature dealing with its implementation is rare. METHODS: This study is a descriptive-correlational study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire from two groups of nurse supervisors randomly selected from a university (n = 55) and a hospital (n = 31). Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: The models most frequently used were 'case-oriented' and 'decision-making oriented'. The nurse supervision was reported as being organized on a one-to-one basis. The focus of supervision was on 'patient problems' and 'cooperation in team'. The theory most commonly used was the theory of reflection. The supervisors' perceptions of moral dilemmas were related to 'decision making' and actions impacting on quality of care resulting from their supervisor styles. CONCLUSION: By correlating the supervisors' styles and their perceptions of ethical dilemmas, we conclude that it is important to contribute to further research on supervisors' styles in order to ensure successful supervision.

Keywords
clinical supervision models, clinical supervision organization, moral dilemmas, nurse supervisors' style
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing and public health science , Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-1766 (URN)10.1046/j.1365-2834.2003.00347.x (DOI)12472863 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-10-06 Created: 2009-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
4. Nurses' satisfaction with their work environment and the outcomes of clinical nursing supervision on nurses' experiences of well-being -- a Norwegian study.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' satisfaction with their work environment and the outcomes of clinical nursing supervision on nurses' experiences of well-being -- a Norwegian study.
2005 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 221-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Various studies have demonstrated that nursing is stressful and that the incidence of occupational stress-related burnout in the profession is high. AIM: This descriptive-correlational study examined nurses' satisfaction with their psychosocial work environment, their moral sensitivity and differences in outcomes of clinical nursing supervision in relation to nurses' well-being by systematically comparing supervised and unsupervised nurses. METHODS: Nurses were selected from two hospitals (n = 71). Data collection was by means of questionnaires and analysed by descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: The nurses' satisfaction with their psychosocial work environment was reflected in six factors: 'job stress and anxiety', 'relationship with colleagues', 'collaboration and good communication', 'job motivation', 'work demands' and 'professional development'. The nurses' perceptions of moral sensitivity comprised seven factors: 'grounds for actions', 'ethical conflicts', 'values in care', 'independence patient-oriented care', 'the desire to provide high-quality care' and 'the desire to provide high-quality care creates ethical dilemmas'. Nurses well-being were reflected in four factors 'physical symptom and anxiety', 'feelings of not being in control', 'engagement and motivation' and 'eye strain sleep disturbance'. The moral sensitivity 'ethical conflicts' were found to have mild negative correlations with psychosocial work environment 'job stress and anxiety professional development' and with 'total score' psychosocial work, moral sensitivity factor 'independence were correlated with psychosocial work factor 'relationships with colleagues' and 'total score', moral sensitivity were mildly correlated with 'collaboration and good communication and had a negative correlation to psychosocial work factor 'work demands'. In addition, significant correlations were found between the nurses' well-being profile and demographic variables, between 'engagement and motivation' and 'absence due to illness' and between 'time allocation for tasks', 'physical symptoms and anxiety' and 'age'. Mild significant differences were found between nurses attending and not attending group supervision and between 'physical symptoms and anxiety' and 'feelings of not being in control'. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that ethical conflicts in nursing are a source of job-related stress and anxiety. The outcome of supporting nurses by clinical nursing supervision may have a positive influence on their perceptions of well-being. clinical nursing supervision have a positive effect on nurses physical symptoms and their feeling of anxiety as well as having a sense of being in control of the situation. We also conclude that psychosocial work have an influence on nurses experience of having or not having control and their engagement and motivation.

Keywords
clinical nursing supervision, ethical conflicts, job stress, moral sensitivity, psychosocial work environment
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-1744 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2834.2004.00527.x (DOI)15819834 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-10-02 Created: 2009-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
5. Comparative study of perceptions of work environment and moral sensitivity among Japanese and Norwegian nurses
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative study of perceptions of work environment and moral sensitivity among Japanese and Norwegian nurses
Show others...
2004 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 193-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between work environment and moral sensitivity among Japanese (n = 138) and Norwegian nurses (n = 71), and to compare the results from a sociocultural perspective using a descriptive-correlational design. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results point to a significant relationship between work environment and moral sensitivity for both groups of nurses. In comparison, the Japanese nurses were more focused on 'patient centered oriented care', reported 'work engagement', seeking 'meaning in difficult caring situations' and 'following rules'. In addition, they ranked the factor 'values in action of patient care' as significant and 'relation to superior and colleagues' and 'job stress and anxiety' ranked significant to 'moral conflicts'. The Norwegian nurses were more independent, which was correlated with moderate significance with 'job stress and anxiety'. A significant correlation was found between 'physical and mental symptoms' and 'moral conflicts' among Norwegian nurses.

Keywords
anxiety, independence, job stress, moral conflicts, nurses, patient-oriented care, sociocultural
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing and public health science , Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-1754 (URN)10.1111/j.1442-2018.2004.00192.x (DOI)15291767 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-10-06 Created: 2009-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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