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Predicting child aggression: The role of parent and child endorsement of reactive aggression across 13 cultural groups in 9 nations.
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, (USA).
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. (BUV)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3328-6538
Duke University, Durham, (USA).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1956-4917
Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5760-6711
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2023 (English)In: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 183-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parent and child endorsement of reactive aggression both predict the emergence of child aggression, but they are rarely studied together and in longitudinal contexts. The present study does so by examining the unique predictive effects of parent and child endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 on child aggression at age 9 in 1456 children from 13 cultural groups in 9 nations. Multiple group structural equation models explored whether age 8 child and parent endorsement of reactive aggression predicted subsequent age 9 child endorsement of reactive aggression and child aggression, after accounting for prior child aggression and parent education. Results revealed that greater parent endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 predicted greater child endorsement of aggression at age 9, that greater parent endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 uniquely predicted greater aggression at age 9 in girls, and that greater child endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 uniquely predicted greater aggression at age 9 in boys. All three of these associations emerged across cultures. Implications of, and explanations for, study findings are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023. Vol. 49, no 3, p. 183-197
Keywords [en]
child, gender differences, international, parent, reactive aggression
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19500DOI: 10.1002/ab.22067ISI: 000903673600001PubMedID: 36565473Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85145101569OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-19500DiVA, id: diva2:1730013
Note

Research Funding

Fogarty International CenterEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Available from: 2023-01-23 Created: 2023-01-23 Last updated: 2024-03-21Bibliographically approved

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Sorbring, EmmaGurdal, Sevtap

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