Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Incredibly loud and extremely silent: Feminist foreign policy on Twitter: Feminist foreign policy on Twitter
University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1413-0300
2021 (English)In: Cooperation and Conflict, ISSN 0010-8367, E-ISSN 1460-3691, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 84-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2014, Sweden’s Feminist Foreign Policy (FFP) was announced with a fanfare. This article critically interrogates how Sweden implements the FFP through digital diplomacy by investigating the extent of Sweden’s gender equality activities on Twitter since the introduction of the FFP and by tracing gendered online abuse in digital diplomacy. I focus on Swedish embassy tweets towards two countries where feminism is highly contested – Poland and Hungary. The theoretical inspiration comes from discursive approaches to the spoken and unspoken, enriched by feminist observations about the non-binary character of voice/silence. The method applied is gender driven quantitative and qualitative content analysis. The findings demonstrate that the FFP has not set any significant mark on digital diplomacy in the analyzed cases. The launching of the FFP went completely unnoticed and posts related to gender equality have actually decreased since 2014. There are no traces of ambassadors being subjected to gendered online abuse, but heavily xenophobic and paternalistic language is directed at Sweden as a representative of liberal policies.The article contributes to the literature on digital diplomacy by highlighting the (lack of) links between foreign policy and digital diplomacy and it addresses a gap by focusing on gender in digital diplomacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. Vol. 57, no 1, p. 84-107
Keywords [en]
Central Europe, digital diplomacy, feminist foreign policy, gender, signalling, Twitter
National Category
Gender Studies Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17885DOI: 10.1177/00108367211000793ISI: 000635301800001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85103387839OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-17885DiVA, id: diva2:1617677
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2021-12-07 Created: 2021-12-07 Last updated: 2022-04-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(700 kB)277 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 700 kBChecksum SHA-512
5c16711c20158bc4332c8763654973b8ddc4ce4d963dd420316360bca46ab2262b46ef081ddde7b02fcf161b059cbd5afa7482af1e4c164334ef1e875ea79db6
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Jezierska, Katarzyna

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jezierska, Katarzyna
By organisation
Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics
In the same journal
Cooperation and Conflict
Gender StudiesPolitical Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 277 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 160 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf