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Experiences of family violence and parental unavailability in childhood in relation to parental socioeconomic position and psychological problems: a cohort study of young Swedish women 1990-2013.
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, , Gothenburg (SWE).
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro (SWE).
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
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2021 (English)In: BMC Women's Health, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Despite the high prevalence and severe consequences for health and wellbeing, epidemiological research of neglected emotional needs during childhood is scarce and little is known about its relation to parental socioeconomic position (SEP). This study investigates the prevalence of family violence and parental unavailability in childhood and its association with parental SEP and parental psychological problems in four strata of young Swedish women examined 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2013.

METHOD: The sample comprised 976 women (mean age 22, range 20-25) living in Sweden. Secular trends for family violence, parental rejection and unavailability were analyzed using logistic regression as a function of year of examination. The associations with parental SEP and parental psychological problems were assessed using logistic regression with results in terms of odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS: Gendered patterns were observed in the associations between parental psychological problems and family violence and parental unavailability. Maternal psychological problems were associated with maternal rejection OR 6.8 (3.5-13.0), maternal lack of time OR 2.4 (1.2-5.0), and paternal rejection OR 1.9 (1.1-3.5). Paternal psychological problems were associated with paternal rejection OR 4.0 (2.1-7.7), paternal lack of time OR 4.9 (2.3-10.6), and experiencing family violence OR 4.9 (2.1-11.6). Low and medium parental SEP were associated with experience of family violence in childhood OR 3.1 (CI 1.1-8.5) and OR 3.4 (1.7-6.9), respectively. No changes between 1990 and 2013 were observed for the prevalence of any of the outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: A stable prevalence of family violence and parental unavailability was reported by young women examined between 1990 and 2013. Lower socioeconomic position was associated with family violence while the association with parental unavailability was non-significant. Gendered patterns were observed in the association between parental psychological problems and family violence, where paternal but not maternal psychological problems were associated with family violence. Further, maternal psychological problems were associated with paternal rejection while paternal psychological problems were not associated with maternal rejection. Gendered patterns of parental unavailability need further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. Vol. 21, no 1, article id 145
Keywords [en]
Childhood, Family violence, Parental lack of time, Parental rejection, Parental unavailability, Socioeconomic position, Women
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17459DOI: 10.1186/s12905-021-01292-7ISI: 000639147800001PubMedID: 33836730Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85104064786OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-17459DiVA, id: diva2:1604120
Note

Open access funding provided by University of Gothenburg. This study was funded by the Swedish research council for health, working life and well-being (Dnr 2016-00965).

Available from: 2021-10-18 Created: 2021-10-18 Last updated: 2023-08-28

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Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur

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