Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Investigating Swedes’ attitudes towards their own and other Swedes’ English accents
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
2021 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Within the sociolinguistic field of accent attitudes, it has often been shown that both native and non-native speakers show preference for certain accents, especially for native varieties. This ‘native speakerism’ can have a negative impact on second language speakers, as the stigmatisation they may experience can hinder their willingness to speak. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate accent attitudes of an English as a second language speaker group: Swedish L1 speakers of English, focusing on their attitudes towards their own English accents and their attitudes towards other Swedes’ English accents. The relationship between these attitudes were also examined. In doing so, the study drew on Standard Language Ideology and Social Identity Theory as the theoretical frameworks. In order to answer the research questions, data was collected through a questionnaire which collected 612 responses. Respondents’ answers were then quantified into descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that most respondents were positive towards their own and other Swedes’ English accents. However, there was a strong conformity to the Standard Language Ideology amongst the participating Swedes. The participants generally did not have a strong need to express their Swedish identity through their Swedish accents, which could also be attributed to the strong native norm. The results also showed that native norms were stronger in English L2 settings, while Swedish identity was more important for those living in a native English-speaking country. Finally, those who were positive towards Swedes’ English accents were more likely to value their Swedish identity, while those who were negative towards other Swedes’ English accents were themselves more likely to conform strongly to native norms. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. , p. 46
Keywords [en]
Accent attitudes, Standard Language Ideology, Social Identity Theory
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17520Local ID: EON200OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-17520DiVA, id: diva2:1599230
Subject / course
English
Educational program
Course
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2021-10-01 Created: 2021-09-30 Last updated: 2021-10-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(977 kB)300 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 977 kBChecksum SHA-512
7da6c1a0c86e736d7536280795d72853cc7aa1123878dfceb23541b73fb29d19c40777ae3ee833f4cb70c9f0db6a35d7a94ac235a1a7c339d9dfbd760de48fef
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Division for Educational Science and Languages
Languages and Literature

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 300 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 292 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf