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Cooperative learning in parental education groups: child healthcare nurses’ views on their work asleaders and on the groups
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden. (BUV; LINA)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1391-3346
Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
Academic Primary Care Centre, Region Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
e Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
2021 (English)In: Children's health care, ISSN 0273-9615, E-ISSN 1532-6888, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 20-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New parents are offered parental education groups as a way to support their transition to parenthood. Interactive approaches in these groups are of importance, but studies have reported a lack of activities that support interaction. Cooperative learning is a structured method when working with groups and based on five elements essential to maximizing the cooperative potential of groups. The aim was to investigate the leadership skills of child healthcare nurses as leaders for parental education groups, their ideas about creating conditions for wellfunctioning groups, and what is required to achieve this. The results were analyzed and discussed using social interdependence theory as a framework and especially the five elements of cooperative learning. Further, the study used a qualitative descriptive design, and eight qualitative interviews were analyzed deductively using thematic analysis. The results showed that in their narratives the nurses display vocational knowledge and describe conditions important for their groups from a cooperative learning perspective. Nevertheless, the results indicate that the nurses had difficulty explicitly instructing parents to use their personal experiences and social skills to get groups to function effectively. Knowledge developed in the workplaces from the experience of leading groups is mostly implicit, and formal knowledge and awareness of leadership is necessary for development of the role.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2021. Vol. 51, no 1, p. 20-36
Keywords [en]
Child healthcare nurses; cooperative learning; leadership; parental education groups; social interdependence iheory
National Category
Pedagogy Nursing
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-16966DOI: 10.1080/02739615.2021.1949319ISI: 000678973400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85111690617OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-16966DiVA, id: diva2:1584420
Available from: 2021-08-12 Created: 2021-08-12 Last updated: 2022-04-04Bibliographically approved

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Forslund Frykedal, Karin

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