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Job demands, work engagement and job turnover intentions among registered nurses: Explained by work-family private life inference
University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level. (LINA)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2793-9937
University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. (LINA)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8562-5610
2021 (English)In: Work, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 1157-1169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The job demands on nurses have increased. Conflict between work life and family life may lead to stress and lower work engagement. Consequently, nurses may choose a different career path or leave the profession.

Objective: Examine the extent to which perceived job demands (interpersonal conflicts at work and workload), work engagement, work-family conflict and family-work conflict are associated with turnover intentions, and examine a possible moderating effect of work-family conflict on the relationship between the intention to leave the nursing profession, job demands and work engagement.

Methods: Cross-sectional study using Hobfoll's Conservation of Resources theory. Data were collected from a sample of 807 registered nurses (RNs) from western Sweden. Tests of moderation were conducted using the PROCESS software macro developed by Andrew F. Hayes.

Results: Work-family conflict was a significant moderator in the relationship between the intentions to leave the nursing profession and work engagement as well as interpersonal conflicts at work. Low work engagement, high work-family conflict and high job demands intensify turnover intentions in well-educated and well-experienced nurses.

Conclusions: The results imply that work-family conflict has a greater impact when RNs experience lower work engagement. In other words, higher motivation implies a lower moderation effect of work-family conflict. Managers should promote a positive working climate by listening to and providing nurses with opportunities to develop their skills. By so doing, managers can gain better understanding of nurses' resources, knowledge and work situation, thus strengthening nurses' confidence and ability to practice their profession.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2021. Vol. 68, no 4, p. 1157-1169
Keywords [en]
Conservation of resources theory; nurses; turnover intentions; work engagement; work-family conflict
National Category
Applied Psychology Nursing
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-16965DOI: 10.3233/WOR-213445ISI: 000647272000020PubMedID: 33867375Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85105457946OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-16965DiVA, id: diva2:1583853
Available from: 2021-08-10 Created: 2021-08-10 Last updated: 2022-01-20Bibliographically approved

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Pennbrant, SandraDåderman, Anna Maria

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Section for nursing - undergraduate levelDivision of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology
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