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Chaos, Danger, and Maternal Parenting in Families: Links with Adolescent Adjustment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
Universidad San Buenaventura,Consultorio Psicologico Popular, Medellín, Colombia.
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2019 (English)In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 22, no 5, article id e12855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current longitudinal study is the first comparative investigation across Low- and Middle- Income Countries (LMICs) to test the hypothesis that harsher and less affectionate maternal parenting (child age 14 years, on average) statistically mediates the prediction from prior household chaos and neighborhood danger (at 13 years) to subsequent adolescent maladjustment (externalizing, internalizing, and school performance problems at 15 years). The sample included 511 urban families in six LMICs: China, Colombia, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, and Thailand. Multigroup structural equation modeling showed consistent associations between chaos, danger, affectionate and harsh parenting, and adolescent adjustment problems. There was some support for the hypothesis, with nearly all countries showing a modest indirect effect of maternal hostility (but not affection) for adolescent externalizing, internalizing, and scholastic problems. Results provide further evidence that chaotic home and dangerous neighborhood environments increase risk for adolescent maladjustment in LMIC contexts, via harsher maternal parenting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 22, no 5, article id e12855
Keywords [en]
low-income and middle-income countries, adolescence, internalizing, externalizing, academic achievement, parenting
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13859DOI: 10.1111/desc.12855ISI: 000483697700008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85066500076OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-13859DiVA, id: diva2:1316174
Available from: 2019-05-16 Created: 2019-05-16 Last updated: 2019-10-15Bibliographically approved

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Sorbring, Emma

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