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Household income predicts trajectories of child internalizing and externalizing behavior in high-, middle-, and low-income countries
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined longitudinal links between household income and parents' education and children's trajectories of internalizing and externalizing behaviors from age 8 to 10 reported by mothers, fathers, and children. Longitudinal data from 1,190 families in 11 cultural groups in eight countries (Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States) were included. Multigroup structural equation models revealed that household income, but not maternal or paternal education, was related to trajectories of mother-, father-, and child-reported internalizing and externalizing problems in each of the 11 cultural groups. Our findings highlight that in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, socioeconomic risk is related to children's internalizing and externalizing problems, extending the international focus beyond children's physical health to their emotional and behavioral development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Ltd , 2019. Vol. 43, no 1, p. 74-79
Keywords [en]
article, child, Colombia, controlled study, education, father, female, health, high income country, household income, human, human experiment, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, low income country, male, mother, Philippines, social status, structural equation modeling, Sweden, Thailand, United States
National Category
Pediatrics Social Work
Research subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Psychology; Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13045DOI: 10.1177/0165025418783272ISI: 000454316400009PubMedID: 30739968Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85049776045OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hv-13045DiVA, id: diva2:1259263
Note

Funders: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, RO1-HD05480; Fogarty International Center, RO3-TW008141; Jacobs Foundation ; Intramural Research Program of the NIH/NICHD

Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved

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Sorbring, Emma

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