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Baiamonte, Lidia
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Baiamonte, L., Björklund, S., Mulone, A., Klement, U. & Joshi, S. V. (2021). Carbide-laden coatings deposited using a hand-held high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF) spray gun. Surface & Coatings Technology, 406, Article ID 126725.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbide-laden coatings deposited using a hand-held high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF) spray gun
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2021 (English)In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 406, article id 126725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Driven by sustainability and cost considerations, there is growing interest in power generation utilizing renewable sources, especially biomass and waste. While premature degradation of power plant components due to corrosion is well-known, erosion can be a dominant damage mechanism in plants that use “pure” biomass with less corrosive elements like Cl, K, etc. Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) parts are prone to erosion-driven damage and demand periodic re-protection or replacement. In response to the above, this preliminary study evaluates a selection of complex carbide-based coatings to enhance protection against erosion to prolong service life of boiler components. Recognizing on-site coating requirements of real boiler applications, a specific focus is on evaluating performance of a hand-held high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF) spray gun and compare it with the current state-of-the-art high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) deposition. Coatings developed by the above routes have been characterized with microstructural analyses, and their performance evaluated and ranked in an air-jet erosion rig at various impact angles.

Keywords
Hand-held HVAF, Cermet, Chromium carbide, HVOF, Dry particle erosion, Microstructural characterization
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-16129 (URN)10.1016/j.surfcoat.2020.126725 (DOI)000604750600041 ()2-s2.0-85097868101 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-12-17 Created: 2020-12-17 Last updated: 2022-04-01Bibliographically approved
Torkashvand, K., Gupta, M. K., Björklund, S., Marra, F., Baiamonte, L. & Joshi, S. V. (2021). Influence of nozzle configuration and particle size on characteristics and sliding wear behaviour of HVAF-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings. Surface & Coatings Technology, 423, 127585-127585, Article ID 127585.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of nozzle configuration and particle size on characteristics and sliding wear behaviour of HVAF-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings
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2021 (English)In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 423, p. 127585-127585, article id 127585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, effect of feedstock particle size and nozzle configuration on deposition, microstructural features, hardness and sliding wear behaviour of high velocity air fuel (HVAF)-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings was evaluated. Three different WC-CoCr powders with nominal particle sizes of 5/20 μm (fine), 5/30 μm (medium) and 15/45 μm (coarse) were sprayed employing a HVAF gun with four distinct DeLaval nozzle configurations involving different lengths and/or exit diameters. Microstructure, phase constitution and mechanical characteristics of the coatings were evaluated using SEM, EDS, XRD and micro indentation testing. Specific wear rate for all the samples was determined under sliding conditions and a comprehensive post wear analysis was conducted. X-ray diffraction analysis showed negligible decarburization in all the HVAF-sprayed coatings. It was shown that decrease in particle size of employed feedstock results in discernible changes in microstructural features of the coatings as well as considerable improvement in their performance. Also, notable changes in wear mechanisms were identified on reducing particle size from coarse to medium or fine. Fine and coarse feedstock powders were found to be sensitive to the type of nozzle used while no major difference was observed in coatings from powders with medium cut size sprayed with different nozzles. 

Keywords
Particle size, Nozzle configuration, HVAF, WC-CoCr, Sliding wear
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20918 (URN)10.1016/j.surfcoat.2021.127585 (DOI)000697566200017 ()2-s2.0-85108196054 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20180197
Note

Knowledge Foundation, Sweden for project HiPerCOAT (Dnr. 20180197)

Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Torkashvand, K., Gupta, M. K., Björklund, S., Marra, F., Baiamonte, L. & Joshi, S. V. (2021). Influence of nozzle configuration and particle size on characteristics and sliding wear behaviour of HVAF-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings. Surface and Coatings Technology, 423, 1-16, Article ID 127585.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of nozzle configuration and particle size on characteristics and sliding wear behaviour of HVAF-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings
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2021 (English)In: Surface and Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, Vol. 423, p. 1-16, article id 127585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, effect of feedstock particle size and nozzle configuration on deposition, microstructural features, hardness and sliding wear behaviour of high velocity air fuel (HVAF)-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings was evaluated. Three different WC-CoCr powders with nominal particle sizes of 5/20 μm (fine), 5/30 μm (medium) and 15/45 μm (coarse) were sprayed employing a HVAF gun with four distinct DeLaval nozzle configurations involving different lengths and/or exit diameters. Microstructure, phase constitution and mechanical characteristics of the coatings were evaluated using SEM, EDS, XRD and micro indentation testing. Specific wear rate for all the samples was determined under sliding conditions and a comprehensive post wear analysis was conducted. X-ray diffraction analysis showed negligible decarburization in all the HVAF-sprayed coatings. It was shown that decrease in particle size of employed feedstock results in discernible changes in microstructural features of the coatings as well as considerable improvement in their performance. Also, notable changes in wear mechanisms were identified on reducing particle size from coarse to medium or fine. Fine and coarse feedstock powders were found to be sensitive to the type of nozzle used while no major difference was observed in coatings from powders with medium cut size sprayed with different nozzles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Particle size, Nozzle configuration, HVAFWC-CoCr, Sliding wear
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17483 (URN)10.1016/j.surfcoat.2021.127585 (DOI)000697566200017 ()2-s2.0-85108196054 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-22 Created: 2021-09-22 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Mahade, S., Baiamonte, L., Sadeghi, E., Björklund, S., Marra, F. & Joshi, S. V. (2021). Novel utilization of powder-suspension hybrid feedstock in HVAF spraying to deposit improved wear and corrosion resistant coatings. Surface & Coatings Technology, 412, Article ID 127015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel utilization of powder-suspension hybrid feedstock in HVAF spraying to deposit improved wear and corrosion resistant coatings
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2021 (English)In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 412, article id 127015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Deployment of a suspension feedstock has been known to alleviate problems associated with using sub-micron and nanosized powder feedstock for thermal spraying of monolithic as well as powder-suspension ‘hybrid’ composite coatings. However, a powder-suspension hybrid feedstock has never been previously used in high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF) spraying. In this work, for the very first time, a chromium carbide (Cr3C2) suspension has been co-sprayed along with an Inconel-625 (IN-625) powder by the HVAF process as an illustrative case study. Two variants of the IN-625 + Cr3C2 hybrid coatings were produced by varying relative powder-suspension feed rates. For comparison, pure IN-625 coating was also deposited utilizing identical spray parameters. Detailed microstructural characterization, porosity content, hardness measurement and phase analysis of the as-deposited coatings was performed. The suspension-derived carbides were retained in the bulk of the coating, resulting in higher hardness. In the dry sliding wear test, the hybrid coatings demonstrated lower wear rate and higher coefficient of friction (CoF) compared to the conventional, powder-derived IN-625 coatings. Furthermore, the wear rate improved slightly with an increase in Cr3C2 content in the hybrid coating. Post-wear analysis of the worn coating, worn alumina ball and the wear debris was performed to understand the wear mechanisms and material transfer in the investigated coatings. In the potentiodynamic polarization test, higher corrosion resistance for hybrid coatings than conventional IN-625 coatings was achieved, indicating that the incorporation of a secondary, carbide phase in the IN-625 matrix did not compromise its corrosion performance. This work demonstrates a novel approach to incorporate any finely distributed second phase in HVAF sprayed coatings to enhance their performance when exposed to harsh environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Inconel-625; Chromium carbide; Suspension; High velocity air fuel; Corrosion; Wear
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17103 (URN)10.1016/j.surfcoat.2021.127015 (DOI)000655555000013 ()2-s2.0-85101937053 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20180197
Available from: 2021-12-22 Created: 2021-12-22 Last updated: 2021-12-22
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