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Gellerstedt, M., Melin, J., Johansson, V. & Angenete, E. (2022). Are patients willing to take a more active role?: Questionnaires to measure patients’ willingness to be empowered. Patient Education and Counseling, 105(3), 741-749
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are patients willing to take a more active role?: Questionnaires to measure patients’ willingness to be empowered
2022 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 741-749Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

One crucial prerequisite for increased patient empowerment is the willingness among patients to take a more active role. The aim of this study was to develop questionnaires for measuring a patient’s willingness to be empowered in general and by using e-health.

Methods

The study was based on a random sample from an online panel. The 800 responders were Swedish citizens and reflected the internet-using population in Sweden regarding age, gender, income, and education. The measurement properties were evaluated according to the Rasch Measurement Theory.

Results

The analyses showed two questionnaires with adequate fit to the basic measurement model and with high reliability (PSI 0.84 and 0.89, respectively).

Conclusion

We conclude that this study generated two questionnaires with an intuitive order of items illustrating an understandable progression of willingness to be empowered in general as well as for e-health.Practice implicationsThe suggested questionnaires are valuable tools supporting the effort to tailor empowerment strategies to meet the patient’s willingness. Questionnaires will also be valuable for evaluating strategies for supporting willingness, studying factors related to willingness and potential inequalities due to e.g. varying digital literacy, and for enabling identification of patient stereotypes using cluster analyses.

Keywords
Willingness, Patient empowerment, Questionnaire, Rasch analysis
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-18066 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2021.07.006 (DOI)000820505900027 ()2-s2.0-85111520789 (Scopus ID)
Note

We are deeply grateful to the research environment “Learning in and for the new working life,” University West, Sweden and the research institute RISE Knowledge Platform “Centre for Categorically Based Measures” for sponsoring the costs for using the online panel and services offered by Kantar-Sifo. The study was financed by grants from the Swedish government under the agreement between the Swedish government and the county councils, the ALF agree-ment ALFGBG-716581

Available from: 2022-01-18 Created: 2022-01-18 Last updated: 2024-04-05
Islind, A. S., Johansson, V., Vallo Hult, H., Alsén, P., Andreasson, E., Angenete, E. & Gellerstedt, M. (2021). Individualized blended care for patients with colorectal cancer: the patient's view on informational support.. Supportive Care in Cancer, 29, 3061-3067
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individualized blended care for patients with colorectal cancer: the patient's view on informational support.
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2021 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 29, p. 3061-3067Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The number of colorectal cancer patient survivors is increasing. Information and support during and after treatment are requested by patients, but questions remain on what to provide. The aim of this study was to understand what informational needs colorectal cancer patients and survivors have, with a focus on the potential support given by patient peers and the use of blended care.

METHODS: A qualitative study using focus groups was conducted with patients diagnosed at the same hospital at least one year prior to the initiation of the study. The focus group interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using deductive content analysis.

RESULTS: The need for informational support varied over time and depended on individual patient characteristics. Timing was crucial and patients requested options of blended care and informational support after treatment cessation. The patients felt alone after treatment and requested assistance in communication with their next-of-kin. They also identified the value of peer support, especially to contextualize knowledge provided by healthcare.

CONCLUSION: This study showed a need for focus on individualized informational support. Blended care through integrating communication with peers online could be one way to support patients, both to enable shared decision-making as well as to provide person-centered care.

Keywords
Blended Care, Cancer, Colon cancer, Communication, Information, Patient information, Patient satisfaction
National Category
Nursing Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-16011 (URN)10.1007/s00520-020-05810-5 (DOI)000577045900002 ()33044626 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85092493781 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-17 Created: 2020-11-17 Last updated: 2022-01-18Bibliographically approved
Islind, A. S., Vallo Hult, H., Johansson, V., Angenete, E. & Gellerstedt, M. (2021). Invisible Work Meets Visible Work: Infrastructuring from the Perspective of Patients and Healthcare Professionals. In: Proceedings of the 54th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences: (pp. 3556-3565). Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisible Work Meets Visible Work: Infrastructuring from the Perspective of Patients and Healthcare Professionals
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2021 (English)In: Proceedings of the 54th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences , 2021, p. 3556-3565Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increased patient engagement and the use of new types of data, such as patient-generated health data (PGHD) is shifting how work is performed in relation to healthcare. This change enables healthcare professionals to delegate parts of work previously conducted by them to patients. There is a consensus regarding the need for nurses and physicians to work seamlessly together to make healthcare flow, but the role and responsibility of patients are less researched. In this paper, we aim to fill that gap by focusing on the shift of work from healthcare professionals to patients from the perspective of i) patients and ii) healthcare professionals. We use infrastructuring as a lens to understand the design of everyday work and actions from both perspectives. The main contribution is an analysis of, and insights into, how the work of patients can support healthcare professionals along with a conceptualization of how infrastructuring processes within and outside of healthcare are interconnected.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2021
Keywords
ICT-enabled Self-management of Chronic Diseases and Conditions, healthcare work, infrastructuring, patient perspective
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-18068 (URN)10.24251/HICSS.2021.431 (DOI)2-s2.0-85108305481 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Available from: 2022-01-18 Created: 2022-01-18 Last updated: 2022-03-29Bibliographically approved
Johansson, V., Islind, A. S., Lindroth, T., Angenete, E. & Gellerstedt, M. (2021). Online Communities as a Driver for Patient Empowerment: Systematic Review.. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 23(2), Article ID e19910.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online Communities as a Driver for Patient Empowerment: Systematic Review.
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 23, no 2, article id e19910Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The use of online resources has changed how people manage health care processes. Patients seek information about health conditions, guidance in treatment, and support from peers online, complementary to traditional health care trajectories. Online communities have the potential to contribute to the quality of care by increasing patient empowerment; however, there is a gap in research regarding in what way online communities contribute to patient empowerment.

OBJECTIVE: We synthesized research regarding how online communities contribute to patient empowerment to address the research question "In what ways can participation in online communities support patient empowerment?" by studying how patient empowerment is operationalized in different studies. The definition of patient empowerment used in this paper is enablement for people to develop mastery over actions and control over decisions that influence their lives. The mastery is both through processes and outcomes of the development.

METHODS: A systematic review was conducted by searching in the following databases: Scopus, ACM Digital Library, EBSCO (CINAHL and MEDLINE), PubMed, and Web of Science. In total, there were 1187 papers after excluding duplicates, and through selection processes using an analytical framework with definitions of patient empowerment and related concepts, 33 peer-reviewed papers were included.

RESULTS: Findings indicated that online communities support patient empowerment both as a process and as outcomes of these processes. Additionally, it was seen as a complement to traditional health care and encouragement for health care professionals to have a more positive attitude toward patients' usage. There was a mix between deductive (19/33, 58%), inductive (11/33, 33%), and a mixed approach (3/33, 9%) of studying patient empowerment in various forms. The online communities in most papers (21/33, 64%) were well-established and represented patients' initiatives.

CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to include professionals' perspectives regarding how health care can embrace patient empowerment through online communities. This systematic review's main contribution is the proposal of a new framework and conceptualization of how patient empowerment in online communities can be understood from different hierarchical levels.

Keywords
eHealth, online community, patient empowerment, person-centered care, systematic review
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-16333 (URN)10.2196/19910 (DOI)000616405900007 ()33560233 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85101007136 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-12 Created: 2021-03-12 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Gjellebæk, C., Johansson, V. & Samuelson, S. (2020). Application of work integrated learning in descriptions of practical implications: A study of dissertation work within Informatics with specialization in Work Integrated Learning. In: Kristina Johansson (Ed.), VILÄR: 3–4 December 2020 University West,Trollhättan. Abstracts. Paper presented at VILÄR. 3–4 December 2020 University West,Trollhättan (pp. 4-5). Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of work integrated learning in descriptions of practical implications: A study of dissertation work within Informatics with specialization in Work Integrated Learning
2020 (English)In: VILÄR: 3–4 December 2020 University West,Trollhättan. Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2020, p. 4-5Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background:  In 2002, the Swedish government assigned University West (UW) to develop work integrated learning (WIL). WIL is linked to learning in both organizational contexts and higher education. Research activities at UW are rooted inpractice and expected to contribute to practice and societal impact and focus on “Learning in and for a New Working Life”. Doctoral studies represents important premise suppliers for future research and contribution to the development of WIL, thus UW has provided doctoral programs with a specialization in work integrated learning since 2012.

This paper will explore how WIL and practical implications are described in dissertation work published between 2018-2019, within the doctoral program of Informatics with specialization in WIL (IWIL) at UW.

Methods: Seven dissertations within IWIL were analyzed based on questions related to descriptions of the practice domain and – perspective, relation between research(er)and practice, and the research’s implications for practice. All analyses were discussed based on the intention of WIL as a basis of values.Results: Dissertations were mainly based on engaged research approaches. Despite approach, the analyses revealed the collaborative processes to be scarcely described. Practice domain, problems and challenges are generally well displayed, but mainly representing the research perspective. Lessons learned, insights and reflections arising as part of collaborative processes are not pronounced clearly. Practical implications are often vague, difficult to identify, and presented from a research perspective operationalized as “principles” or recommendations. Added value and implemented changes are slightly discussed. Conclusion: The dissertations meet the intention of contributing to “learning in a new working life”. However, to be in line with WIL the research(er) need more focus on the practice perspective to provide “learning for a new working life”. Different perspectives on practical implications, outcome of collaborative processes and final result should be more explicit in dissertations within doctoral programs within IWIL

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst, 2020
Keywords
Work-integrated learning, practical implications
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-16221 (URN)978-91-88847-86-7 (ISBN)
Conference
VILÄR. 3–4 December 2020 University West,Trollhättan
Available from: 2021-01-19 Created: 2021-01-19 Last updated: 2021-01-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8427-0961

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