Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Patriksson, Katarina
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Ekelöf, K., Sæther, E., Santesson, A., Wilander, M., Patriksson, K., Hesselman, S., . . . Andersson, O. (2022). A hybrid type I, multi-center randomized controlled trial to study the implementation of a method for Sustained cord circulation And VEntilation (the SAVE-method) of late preterm and term neonates: a study protocol. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 22(1), Article ID 593.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A hybrid type I, multi-center randomized controlled trial to study the implementation of a method for Sustained cord circulation And VEntilation (the SAVE-method) of late preterm and term neonates: a study protocol
Show others...
2022 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: An intact umbilical cord allows the physiological transfusion of blood from the placenta to the neonate, which reduces infant iron deficiency and is associated with improved development during early childhood. The implementation of delayed cord clamping practice varies depending on mode of delivery, as well as gestational age and neonatal compromise. Emerging evidence shows that infants requiring resuscitation would benefit if respiratory support were provided with the umbilical cord intact. Common barriers to providing intact cord resuscitation is the availability of neonatal resuscitation equipment close to the mother, organizational readiness for change as well as attitudes and beliefs about placental transfusion within the multidisciplinary team. Hence, clinical evaluations of cord clamping practice should include implementation outcomes in order to develop strategies for optimal cord management practice. Methods: The Sustained cord circulation And Ventilation (SAVE) study is a hybrid type I randomized controlled study combining the evaluation of clinical outcomes with implementation and health service outcomes. In phase I of the study, a method for providing in-bed intact cord resuscitation was developed, in phase II of the study the intervention was adapted to be used in multiple settings. In phase III of the study, a full-scale multicenter study will be initiated with concurrent evaluation of clinical, implementation and health service outcomes. Clinical data on neonatal outcomes will be recorded at the labor and neonatal units. Implementation outcomes will be collected from electronic surveys sent to parents as well as staff and managers within the birth and neonatal units. Descriptive and comparative statistics and regression modelling will be used for analysis. Quantitative data will be supplemented by qualitative methods using a thematic analysis with an inductive approach. Discussion: The SAVE study enables the safe development and evaluation of a method for intact cord resuscitation in a multicenter trial. The study identifies barriers and facilitators for intact cord resuscitation. The knowledge provided from the study will be of benefit for the development of cord clamping practice in different challenging clinical settings and provide evidence for development of clinical guidelines regarding optimal cord clamping. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT04070560. Registered 28 August 2019.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Child, Preschool; Female; Health Services; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Infant, Premature; Multicenter Studies as Topic; Placenta; Pregnancy; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Resuscitation; Time Factors; Umbilical Cord; article; artificial ventilation; clinical evaluation; clinical outcome; controlled study; delayed cord clamping; female; human; infant; manager; multicenter study; multidisciplinary team; newborn; outcome assessment; phase 1 clinical trial; phase 2 clinical trial; phase 3 clinical trial; placenta; practice guideline; qualitative analysis; quantitative analysis; randomized controlled trial; regression model; resuscitation; thematic analysis; health service; multicenter study (topic); placenta; pregnancy; prematurity; preschool child; randomized controlled trial (topic); time factor; umbilical cord
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19173 (URN)10.1186/s12884-022-04915-5 (DOI)000830726000006 ()35883044 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134722355 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Open access funding provided by Lund University. The study was supported by a research grant from The Swedish Society of Medical Research. The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Available from: 2022-11-08 Created: 2022-11-08 Last updated: 2022-11-08
Patriksson, K. & Selin, L. (2022). Parents and newborn "togetherness" after birth. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 17(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents and newborn "togetherness" after birth
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 17, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Zero separation is a family-centred approach where newborns should be accompanied by their parents, regardless of the type of birth or health status. To our knowledge, few studies have described the way this approach is realized in clinical practice. This study describes situations of separation between mother/partner and newborn after birth on the labour ward, maternity ward and at the neonatal unit.

Method: An observation study was conducted during four months at a Swedish hospital. All caregivers at the three units were given the task of collecting the data. A semantic thematic analysis was performed with an inductive approach.

Results: Six themes emerged from the analysis. Two themes were common to all three units, one theme was common to two units and three themes emerged at only one unit. The themes describe various causes of separation, such as organizational and economic barriers, clinical routines, parents' own decisions, shortage of collaboration within and between units, as well as a shortage of interprofessional communication.

Conclusion: Our study shows that there is still a gap between the latest evidence-based knowledge of the importance of zero separation and current practice in newborn care. There is a need for continuous collaboration between all units responsible for the care of mother and newborn.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2022
Keywords
birth; child parent relation; female; human; interpersonal communication; mother; neonatal intensive care unit; newborn; pregnancy; Sweden, Communication; Female; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal; Mothers; Parents; Parturition; Pregnancy; Sweden
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-18169 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2022.2026281 (DOI)000746194600001 ()35067210 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85123624103 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding for this study was obtained from, Departement of Research and Development, NU-Hospital Group. Devision of Pediatrics and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, NU-Hospital Group funded caregivers time for the study.

Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2022-03-24
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications