Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Bernhardsson, L., Norström, L. & Andersson, M. (2019). Flipped And Open Seminars As A Method For Work Integrated Learning. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres (eds) (Ed.), INTED2019 Proceedings: . Paper presented at INTED2019, 13th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 11th, 12th and 13th of March, 2019. (pp. 4458-4466). Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flipped And Open Seminars As A Method For Work Integrated Learning
2019 (English)In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres (eds), Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 4458-4466Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since 2002 University West, Sweden has had a mission from the Swedish government to develop methods for work integrated learning (WIL). WIL is thus a “trademark” of the university and the university is continuously developing teaching models to enhance a synergy between theory and practice with the goal to improve education and students’ lifelong learning. A challenge in such work is a decreasing engagement among students to participate in seminars at campus, especially during periods of internship. In the study underlying this paper we therefore explore a new teaching and learning method that aims to stimulate students to come to campus and to discuss their experiences with peer students and teachers during their internship.The internship and the seminars are organized as a ‘WIL course’ in the fifth semester of the candidate program ‘Digital Media’. As part of the course the students spend four days a week in a workplace where they contribute substantially to the work at the workplace. One day a week they spend at campus to reflect, write and discuss topics related to the work and organization at the workplace e.g. organizational culture, how a work day is organized, how design work is organized, and how the workplace treats its customers. The students and teachers meet once every second week for a seminar where they discuss the above-mentioned themes. The reflections made at the seminars and the conversations are important for the learning goals at the course. However, the teachers experience a moderate interest from the students’ side to participate and the students tend to be ill prepared.To increase the value and learning for the students, a new approach for better structure and engagement has been introduced, where students in beforehand writtenly reflect on questions about their workplace in relation to the theme of the week. They write in open and shared documents so that all students before the seminare can take part of each others reflections and as such come to the seminar with a wider perspective on the particular theme. The seminar is then held at the campus where the themes are discussed and workplaces compared with help of a shared matrix where the students can place their workplace regarding level of structure, formality, creativity etc . As such the seminar has a ‘flipped’ character and the ICT tools for learning used are open and editable over time for all participants.The empirical material is based on 24 hours participant observations, 10 students’ written reflections and the course curricula. The findings show that the flipped and open approach to the seminars has made the students more engaged in reflections about their workplace, not only during the seminar at campus but also during their work at the workplace. The shared document stimulates reflections of differences between workplaces that has not been so clear before, and the matrix has helped the students to take the reflections to a higher level by reflecting over organizational culture and workplace conditions. By comparing each other’s experiences from a spectrum of different aspects/themes they get a more nuanced picture of the skills and competences needed in the workplace, and they get more strengthened in their professional role. The recurrent discussions over time during the course therefore contribute to make the students more experienced than they would had been by only having got the experience from their own workplace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019
Keywords
flipped seminar, open seminar, higher education, work integrated learning, shared experience, students.
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-13769 (URN)978-84-09-08619-1 (ISBN)
Conference
INTED2019, 13th annual International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, 11th, 12th and 13th of March, 2019.
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Bernhardsson, L. & Andersson, M. (2019). Research design for learning in WIL. In: Kristina Johansson (Ed.), VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan: Abstracts. Paper presented at VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan (pp. 5-6). Trollhättan: University West
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research design for learning in WIL
2019 (English)In: VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan: Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 5-6Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the Digital Media program, students have the opportunity to complete an internship. In addition to the objectives of the syllabus, they specify their own learning objectives. These knowledge goals rarely align with the course objectives found in the syllabus but focus more on what practical skills they believe they will learn.

In this paper we present planned activities to explore the students' experience and learning during the internship period using mixed methods. The main question is: To what extent can both academic theoretical goals and students' skills goals be combined during the internship period? Students fill out a form of how they themselves feel they are ready for working life, a readiness. Self-esteem of readiness can also be seen as an indicator of what Bandura calls Self Efficacy (Bandura, 2010).Group interviews are conducted and recorded and then transcribed and analyzed, based on survey results investigate whether students who carry out WIL activities feel better prepared for professional life after completing their studies (Purdie et.al., 2013). Students also hand in written reflections on their own learning, where students describe and argue for their learning based on a model called RAT (Replacement, Amplification, Transformation) (Hughes et al., 2006).

Further data is collected through two surveys based on LPW (Learning Potential of the Workplace). It consists of 12 different questions developed by Nikolova et.al. and were presented in article (Nikolova et al., 2014). Collected data is processed and analyzed and should be able to give a clear picture if the internship only served as Work Integrated Education (WIE) or if it was also Work Integrated Learning (WIL). The difference between these concepts is discussed by Billet, which means that merely replacing one form of teaching with another does not always lead to the workplace contributing to student learning (Billett, 2018).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trollhättan: University West, 2019
Keywords
Work-integrated learning, Workplace learning, research design
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; SOCIAL SCIENCE, Educational science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14881 (URN)978-91-88847-43-0 (ISBN)978-91-88847-44-7 (ISBN)
Conference
VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2494-2257

Search in DiVA

Show all publications