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Aijmer Rydsjö, CeliaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2041-6826
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Andersson Hval, U. & Aijmer Rydsjö, C. (2021). Klimatkrisen i klassrummet: Reflektioner kring användning av litteratur i undervisning om hållbar utveckling. Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning (2), 27-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Klimatkrisen i klassrummet: Reflektioner kring användning av litteratur i undervisning om hållbar utveckling
2021 (Swedish)In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, no 2, p. 27-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study shows how climate fiction can offer pedagogical opportunities for encouraging student agency as well as open up constructive discussions about the future in relation to social change and climate justice. In order to test a practical opportunity for such a productive conversation, and to draw out its didactic implications, Swedish teacher trainee students were asked to participate in a group discussion on how climate fiction may be used in the teaching of sustainability in upper secondary school. Specifically, they were requested to contribute to the framing and organization of the discussion of a work of climate fiction, The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline, but they were also asked to reflect on social dimensions of teaching about the climate crisis, such as climate psychology, democracy issues, equality and existential questions. Drawing on the students’ discernments in the discussion, the study finds that insights from climate psychology concerning the importance of problem-focused and meaning-focused coping strategies to handle negative emotions such as worry, fear and hopelessness are relevant for literature didactics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2021
Keywords
climate fiction, education for sustainable development (ESD), climate psychology, literature didactics, teacher education
National Category
Learning Didactics
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17658 (URN)
Available from: 2021-10-29 Created: 2021-10-29 Last updated: 2022-11-17Bibliographically approved
Aijmer Rydsjö, C. (2021). ‘We do no harm, we say what we want, and we get paid for it’: Academic Work and Dignity in Stoner by John Williams. In: Alastair Henry & Åke Persson (Ed.), Engaging with Work in English Studies: An Issue-based Approach (pp. 69-95). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘We do no harm, we say what we want, and we get paid for it’: Academic Work and Dignity in Stoner by John Williams
2021 (English)In: Engaging with Work in English Studies: An Issue-based Approach / [ed] Alastair Henry & Åke Persson, Cham: Springer, 2021, p. 69-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Examining the meaning of work in relation to identity, this chapter looks at literary renditions of jobs in academia, especially in the campus novel. Departing from John Williams’ Stoner (1965), the analysis situates the academic novel in a historical and cultural context where the idea that scholarly labour increases self-worth and dignity is under increasing pressure. Further, the theme of work-life dignity is expanded to a wider discussion of the borders and frontiers of the university, particularly of the humanities, in terms of value, usefulness, and productivity. To fully draw out the implications of the analysis, Stoner is read in relation to a range of academic novels that each conspicuously negotiates work, identity, and dignity, including Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House and J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2021
Keywords
Work, identity
National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17660 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-69720-4 (DOI)978-3-030-69720-4 (ISBN)978-3-030-69719-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-11-02 Created: 2021-11-02 Last updated: 2021-11-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2041-6826

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