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Okenwa Emegwa, L., Paillard-Borg, S., Wallin Lundell, I., Stålberg, A., Åling, M., Ahlenius, G. & Eriksson, H. (2024). Dare to Ask!: A Model for Teaching Nursing Students about Identifying and Responding to Violence against Women and Domestic Violence. Nursing Reports, 14(1), 603-615
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dare to Ask!: A Model for Teaching Nursing Students about Identifying and Responding to Violence against Women and Domestic Violence
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2024 (English)In: Nursing Reports, ISSN 2039-439X, E-ISSN 2039-4403, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 603-615Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of nurses in identifying and responding to family violence and violence against women has long been established. However, nurses’ readiness to fully assume this role remains low due to various barriers and the sensitive nature of the subject. As part of capacity building to address this problem, an additional national qualitative learning target, i.e., to “show knowledge about men’s violence against women and violence in close relationships”, was introduced into the Swedish Higher Education Ordinance for nursing and seven other educational programs between 2017 and 2018.

The aim of this paper is to describe how the national qualitative learning target is incorporated into the undergraduate nursing curriculum at the Swedish Red Cross University College. An overview of relevant teaching and learning activities and how they are organized is first presented, followed by the presentation of a proposed didactic model: Dare to Ask and Act! The model details a step-by-step progression from facts and figures, including the role of gender norms, to recognizing signs of abuse in complex clinical situations, as well as developing skills that enhance the courage to ask and act.

Due to the sensitive nature of violence victimization, the proposed model reflects the importance of making the subject a reoccurring theme in undergraduate nursing education in order to boost nursing students’ interests and confidence to “Dare to Ask and Act!”. The model also shows that making the subject a recurring theme can be achieved with minimal disruptions to and without overcrowding an existing curriculum.

Keywords
nursing education; violence; curriculum; courses; alignment; progression
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21396 (URN)10.3390/nursrep14010046 (DOI)001192965700001 ()2-s2.0-85188920226 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

Available from: 2024-03-13 Created: 2024-03-13 Last updated: 2024-04-26
van Eggermont Arwidson, C., Holmgren, J., Tinghög, P., Eriksson, H. & Gottberg, K. (2024). (Over)crowded house: exploring asylum seekers’ experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic while living at accommodation centers in Sweden. BMC Public Health, 24(1), 1-15, Article ID 622.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(Over)crowded house: exploring asylum seekers’ experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic while living at accommodation centers in Sweden
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2024 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-15, article id 622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The COVID-19 pandemic has made visible the scale of health disparities in society, highlighting how the distribution of infection and deaths differs between population subgroups within countries. Asylum seekers represent a potentially vulnerable group; early in the pandemic, concerns were raised about their housing situation, usually involving overcrowded, camp-like accommodations, and the effects of COVID-19 in relation to this. Hence, this study aimed to explore asylum seekers’ experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic while living at accommodation centers.

Methods

In this qualitative study, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with asylum seekers at two accommodation centers in Sweden. Participants represented a diverse group of asylum seekers in regard to age, educational background, and gender. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results

Experiences related to COVID-19 were highly dependent on the living situation at the accommodation centers and the experience of feeling unsafe in shared spaces. This was enhanced by the experiences of a challenging mix of COVID-19 messages where different understandings of COVID-19 and related measures existed, together with a feeling of loss of control and safety in shared rooms. Additionally, participants felt more isolated from the outside society and missed prior social activities. Adding to this experience of isolation was an increasing mistrust regarding the authorities’ pandemic response.

Conclusion

This study highlights the importance of understanding the specific challenges and vulnerabilities of asylum seekers at accommodation centers during the pandemic, shaped by their housing situation and legal status. The findings underscore the need for context-specific support, holistic disease prevention approaches, and tailored health communication strategies using diverse formats. Additionally, the findings emphasize the crucial need to identify and mobilize existing community resources in planning and implementing pandemic control measures. Furthermore, the study emphasizes governmental responsibility in providing secure housing, and to address long-term vulnerabilities beyond pandemics.

Keywords
Accommodation centers, Asylum seekers, COVID-19 pandemic, Equity, Housing, Qualitative research, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21383 (URN)10.1186/s12889-024-18089-6 (DOI)001177516700003 ()38413952 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85186262277 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Karolinska Institute
Note

CC-BY 4.0

Open access funding provided by Karolinska Institute. The project of which this study is a part was funded by the Swedish Red Cross University.

Available from: 2024-03-12 Created: 2024-03-12 Last updated: 2024-05-16
Salzmann-Erikson, M. & Eriksson, H. (2023). A Mapping Review of Netnography in Nursing. Qualitative Health Research, 33(8-9), 701-714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mapping Review of Netnography in Nursing
2023 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 33, no 8-9, p. 701-714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People use the Web to seek health-related information and to discuss health issues with peers. Netnography, a qualitative research methodology, has gained the attention of researchers interested in people’s health and health issues. However, no previous reviews have accounted for how netnography is used in nursing research. The purpose of this mapping review was to generate a map of netnographic research in nursing. The search was conducted in PubMed, Academic Search Elite, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science. Data were extracted from 53 original articles. The results show an increasing trend in published netnographies over time; 34% of the total sample was published in 2021. Of the total, 28% originated from Sweden, and 81% had used a covert approach. In studies in which the researchers used more participatory designs, the time spent on online forums ranged between 4 weeks and 20 months. Informed consent is found to be an issue in netnographic studies. We discuss the fact that nursing researchers have used netnography to address a wide range of research topics of concern and interest, from self-care support in an online forum for older adults to nursing students’ perspectives on effective pedagogy. In line with the digital transformation in society in general, we discuss the fact that netnography as a research methodology offers great opportunities for nurse researchers to monitor new spaces and places that presuppose online methodological knowledge.

Keywords
netnography, nursing, qualitative research, research ethics, review
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19976 (URN)10.1177/10497323231173794 (DOI)001003114000001 ()37192601 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159720952 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC-BY 4.0

Available from: 2023-05-23 Created: 2023-05-23 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. & Eriksson, H. (2023). An Intersectional Analysis of Health Inequalities and Vulnerabilities During the Covid-19 Pandemic. In: Kemi Ogunyemi, Adaora I. Onaga (Ed.), Responsible Management of Shifts in Work Modes: Values for Post Pandemic Sustainability, Volume 2 (pp. 109-118). Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Intersectional Analysis of Health Inequalities and Vulnerabilities During the Covid-19 Pandemic
2023 (English)In: Responsible Management of Shifts in Work Modes: Values for Post Pandemic Sustainability, Volume 2 / [ed] Kemi Ogunyemi, Adaora I. Onaga, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023, p. 109-118Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapters discusses the power structures affecting access to healthcare and the quality of received care including factors like gender, ethnicity, social and economic status among others from an intersectional perspective. Structural changes are necessary to decrease the health inequalities and vulnerabilities during the pandemic. An intersectional approach helps to display the interactions of different power structures and social categories which put people at differential risk of infection and/or mortality of COVID-19. The intersectional approach should be used not only to understand the pandemic impact on people but also when planning the healthcare policies, care plans and support services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
COVID-19 pandemic, health inequalities, intersectional analysis, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic context
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19626 (URN)10.1108/978-1-80262-723-720221011 (DOI)2-s2.0-85153427512 (Scopus ID)9781802627244 (ISBN)9781802627237 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-01-31 Created: 2023-01-31 Last updated: 2024-05-17Bibliographically approved
Åhs, J. W., Ranheim, A., Mattelin, E., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Distance in Distant Care: Qualitative Content Analysis of Providers’ Experiences in Tele–Mental Care. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 25, Article ID e38568.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distance in Distant Care: Qualitative Content Analysis of Providers’ Experiences in Tele–Mental Care
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e38568Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Tele–mental care is ubiquitous worldwide [1]. It is effective and even preferred by patients [2]. Yet, providers have expressed concerns that the technology limits conveying nonverbal cues [3,4] or impedes the therapeutic relationship [3,5]. These key aspects of communication and interpersonal connection in care could be described as types of distances, where spatial distance could prevent patient observation, and psychological distance may prevent effective interpersonal connection. Considering the growing use of tele–mental care and the relevance of these forms of distance for successful tele–mental care encounters, this study was conducted to explore these or other forms of “distance” that arise in providers’ descriptions of tele–mental care encounters.

Keywords
telehealth; telemedicine; patient care; mental health; care delivery; communication technology; patient-provider; provider; provider experience; health care professional; experience; content analysis; qualitative
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19681 (URN)10.2196/38568 (DOI)001009080900002 ()36800225 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148332476 (Scopus ID)
Note

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.

Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Åhs, J. W., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Distant suffering: A concept analysis.. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 151, Article ID 104672.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distant suffering: A concept analysis.
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 151, article id 104672Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients who are suffering may be commonly encountered in health care. The growing use of telehealth implies that encounters with patients who are suffering may increasingly take place at a distance. "Distant suffering" is a concept coined within sociology to describe the suffering of far-away others. It is conceptualized as a paradox, as distance changes the relation between the witness of suffering and the suffering encountered. Impacts may include a potential detriment to the sufferer and ethical implications for the witness.

OBJECTIVE: To explore the concept of distant suffering and any relevance, implications, or important avenues for potential research within the healthcare sciences.

DESIGN: Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis.

DATA SOURCES: Databases of Web of Science, Medline, CINAHL and PsycInfo were searched for the terms "distant suffering" or "mediated suffering".

REVIEW METHOD: Attributes, surrogate or related terms, antecedents, consequences, and uses of the concept were extracted and synthesized.

RESULTS: Thirty articles published within the past ten years were selected for review from the search results. "Distant suffering" was characterized as comprising 1) mediated far-away suffering, 2) a "recognizer" or witness, and 3) a potential role of a moderator. Antecedents include shared understandings and socially-influenced responses. Consequences include responses like empathy, compassion, pity, also indifference, cynicism and compassion fatigue.

CONCLUSIONS: Further research to explore distant suffering from healthcare sciences' perspective could uncover valuable insights for those suffering, for healthcare workers, and any who are exposed to it. An improved understanding of how distant suffering is conveyed and moderated could enable targeted reduction of exposure or improve response to distant suffering. Such knowledge could help diminish negative consequences for those suffering, for healthcare workers who are caring at a distance for those suffering, or for others who encounter distant suffering in their occupations or in daily life via media, social media, or digital communications.

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: New analysis finds that exposure to distant suffering may have important implications for health and health care.

Keywords
Distress, Health care, Mediation, Suffering, Witnessing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21168 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2023.104672 (DOI)001152982900001 ()38184919 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181810985 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-15 Created: 2024-01-15 Last updated: 2024-04-09Bibliographically approved
Dahlborg, E., Boman, Å., Eriksson, H. & Tengelin, E. (2023). Encircling discourses: A guide to critical discourse analysis in caring science. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Encircling discourses: A guide to critical discourse analysis in caring science
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim

The aim of this article was to introduce Fairclough's critical discourse analysis (CDA) in caring and nursing science, to provide a guide on how to perform such an analysis, and to describe the wider context of discourse epistemology.

Design

The article is designed as a methodological paper, including (a) epistemological roots of discourse analysis, (b) an overview of discourse analytical research within caring and nursing science which points out an increased trend, and (c) a guide to conducting a CDA.

Analysis

It is important that discourse analysis is available and accessible to nursing and caring researchers. Through the process of encircling discourses, valuable insight is given into fields that otherwise would be lost or would not be available.

Conclusion

Our summary stance is that discourse analysis as it is presented in this article is strongly advisable for use in nursing and caring sciences.

Keywords
caring science, critical discourse analysis nursing, discourse analysis, research methods, social construction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20612 (URN)10.1111/scs.13194 (DOI)001025442100001 ()37421160 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85164575364 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-21 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Åhs, J. W., Ranheim, A., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Encountering suffering in digital care: a qualitative study of providers’ experiences in telemental health care. BMC Health Services Research, 23(1), 1-8, Article ID 418.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Encountering suffering in digital care: a qualitative study of providers’ experiences in telemental health care
2023 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 418Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background

Encountering patients who are suffering is common in health care, and particularly when providing mental health care. Telehealth technologies are increasingly used to provide mental health care, yet little is known about the experiences of providers when encountering patients who are suffering within remote care. The present study explored health care providers’ lived experiences of encountering patient suffering during telemental health care.

Methods

A qualitative phenomenological approach was used to uncover participants’ experiences. In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of physicians, psychologists, and therapists who used telemental health in varied clinical practices in Sweden. Data were analyzed using descriptive phenomenology.

Results

Telehealth care with patients who were suffering was experienced by providers as loose connections, both literally in compromised functioning of the technology and figuratively in a compromised ability connecting emotionally with patients. Providers’ lived experiences were explicated into the following aspects: insecurity in digital practice, inaccessibility of the armamentarium, and conviction in the value of telehealth care. Interpersonal connection between patient and provider is necessary. Worry and guilt arose for providers with fears that technology would not work, patient status was deteriorated, or the care needed could not be delivered. Providers overcame barriers in telehealth encounters, and expressed they perceived that patients appreciated the care received, and through it found relief.

Conclusions

This study brings an understanding of experiences in providing telemental care for patients who are suffering. Providers experience challenges in connecting with patients, and in accessing tools needed to enable reaching the goals of the caring encounter. Efforts to ensure functioning of technology, comfort with its use, and accessibility of tools might be some accommodations to support providers for successful and rewarding telehealth care encounters.

Keywords
Telehealth, Suffering, Patient care, Phenomenology, Lived experience, Mental health providers
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19927 (URN)10.1186/s12913-023-09367-x (DOI)000978872200004 ()37127655 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85158060768 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Karolinska Institute
Note

CC BY-4.0

Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Salzmann-Erikson, M. & Eriksson, H. (2023). Hospital shoes and their owners: expressed team identity among healthcare staff by signs of their footwear. International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospital shoes and their owners: expressed team identity among healthcare staff by signs of their footwear
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education, ISSN 1754-3266, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Fashion is a way to express identity and affiliations with specific social networks, and sociocultural organisations of health care facilities are no exception. Employees in hospitals must adhere to strictly regulated dress code policies, albeit shoes are one of few markers that are not regulated.

The aim of this study was to analyse the expressed team identity among healthcare staff by studying signs of personality traits they share with colleagues, as found in their choice of footwear. A total of 213 images of hospital footwear, posted on Instagram, were analysed utilising thematic content analysis.

The results show that choice of footwear signals seven different personality traits: the anonymous, an understated conformist; the discreet standout, a subtle individualist; the doer on the move, an active and ready contributor; the naturist, a barefoot  enthusiast; the superior  tourist,  a  temporarily  elite  visitor;  the  outsider,  an unconventional maverick; and the legend, a battle-scarred veteran.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
Keywords
Health facilities; human characteristics; shoes; social conformity; social media
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20770 (URN)10.1080/17543266.2023.2255879 (DOI)001061425100001 ()2-s2.0-85170576476 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2024-01-11
Aasen, E. M., Dahl, B. M., Ottesen, A. M., Strunck, J., Eriksson, H., Dahlborg, E., . . . Tengelin, E. (2023). Scandinavian Online Cancer Information as Expressions of Governmentality. Advances in Nursing Science, 46(3), 293-305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scandinavian Online Cancer Information as Expressions of Governmentality
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2023 (English)In: Advances in Nursing Science, ISSN 0161-9268, E-ISSN 1550-5014, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 293-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We compared online distributed information provided to patients with cancer in Scandinavian countries through the lens of governmentality. A secondary comparative qualitative analysis was conducted. Discourses in online patient information showed differences in governmentality techniques across the countries: Norway used a paternalist approach, Denmark an educative approach, and Sweden an individualistic approach and expected the patients to make the “right” decisions. Online information for patients with cancer in Denmark and Norway showed high professional and health care system involvement, whereas in Sweden, there was high patient involvement. There was almost no use of the person-centered approach among the online discourses

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2023
Keywords
biopolitics, cancer, discourse, governmentality, nursing, online information, patient, person-centeredness, involvement, Scandinavia
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19090 (URN)10.1097/ans.0000000000000436 (DOI)001041223200009 ()2-s2.0-85164580647 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-31 Created: 2022-08-31 Last updated: 2024-04-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0335-3472

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