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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Godskesen, T. & Rejnö, Å. (2023). Etik i samverkan. In: Annika Eklund & Christian Gadolin (Ed.), Samverkan i vården: från system till praktik (pp. 93-112). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etik i samverkan
2023 (Swedish)In: Samverkan i vården: från system till praktik / [ed] Annika Eklund & Christian Gadolin, Stockholm: Liber, 2023, p. 93-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Boken beskriver samverkan i hälso- och sjukvård ur olika perspektiv och ger verksamhetsnära exempel. Svensk hälso- och sjukvård har jämförelsevis goda resultat men brister i exempelvis kontinuitet och koordinering. Till följd av vårdens ökade specialisering behövs förmågan att samverka för en säker vård och ett effektivt utnyttjande av resurser

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2023
Keywords
cooperation, ethic, medical care, samverkan, etik, omvårdnad
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20356 (URN)9789147145416 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-07-04 Created: 2023-07-04 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Andersson, J., Rejnö, Å., Jakobsson, S., Hanson, P.-O., Nielsen, S. & Björck, L. (2023). Patient´s description of onset stroke symptoms: Oral Presentations. ESOC 2023 Abstract Book. European Stroke Journal, 8(2), 427-427, Article ID 725.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient´s description of onset stroke symptoms: Oral Presentations. ESOC 2023 Abstract Book
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2023 (English)In: European Stroke Journal, ISSN 2396-9873, E-ISSN 2396-9881, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 427-427, article id 725Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Stroke symptoms vary and could be hard to recognize. In addition, stroke severity has decreased according to the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NISSH), with less pronounced symptoms expression. Knowledge on the patient’s description of stroke symptoms is therefore needed. The aim was to describe patient’s symptoms at stroke onset.

Methods: A qualitative content analysis was used. Data were collected through individual interviews with 27 patients (16 men and 11 women, median age 70.4 years). All patients were hospitalized with a first-time stroke. The interviews were conducted within 4 weeks of symptoms onset and before hospital discharge.

Results: All patients had symptoms that affected their daily life. Some patients described having multiple symptoms at the same time, others had symptoms that began insidiously and worsened over time. Symptoms such as overwhelming fatigue or nausea were described as Premonition of becoming ill, feeling unwell or that something was wrong. Motoric bodily changes were multifaceted as slurred speech or dizziness, balance difficulties and losing control of the body or motor dysfunction. But also, that the surroundings were distorted, and solid objects moved around. Symptoms of Dazed and affected senses included confusion and visual impairment or headache.

Conclusions: Stroke is a complex disease with several different symptoms’ expressions and could be difficult to recognize, especially when symptoms are less typical or perceived as not serious. Increased awareness of stroke symptoms among caregivers and among members of the community is important and needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Stroke, patient, symptoms
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21017 (URN)10.1177/23969873231169660 (DOI)
Note

Open Access 

Available from: 2023-11-28 Created: 2023-11-28 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, K., Persson, H. C., Rejnö, Å. & Zelano, J. (2023). Stroke. In: Ozanne, Anneli, Zelano, Johan (Ed.), Teamarbete i neurologisk vård: (pp. 73-114). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stroke
2023 (Swedish)In: Teamarbete i neurologisk vård / [ed] Ozanne, Anneli, Zelano, Johan, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023, p. 73-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

För god vård vid neurologiska sjukdomar behövs många gånger teamsjukvård av flera professioner – sjuksköterskor, läkare, fysio­terapeuter, arbetsterapeuter, logopeder, dietister, socionomer, psykologer, m.fl. Den här boken vill inspirera, ge stöd och förmedla kunskap kring hur teamarbete i neurologisk vård kan utföras och utvecklas 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023
Keywords
Neurologi, stroke, vårdlag, omvårdnad
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20986 (URN)9789144158174 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-24 Created: 2023-11-24 Last updated: 2024-01-26Bibliographically approved
Rejnö, Å., Bråndal, A., von Euler, M. & Pessah-Rasmussen, H. (2023). Strokerehabilitering ur ett vårdkedjeperspektiv. Läkartidningen, 120, Article ID 23060.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strokerehabilitering ur ett vårdkedjeperspektiv
2023 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 120, article id 23060Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

Rehabilitation is a key aspect of the treatment of stroke patients, both acute and in later phases. The patients' needs varies between individuals and over time. Several skills and methods and different professionals working together in teams, as well as coordination along the entire chain of care, are required in order to meet those different needs. Early supported discharge, ESD, is recommended for patients with mild to moderate stroke. Stroke is a chronic disease requiring lifelong structured follow-up focusing not only on medical treatment but also on lifestyle, mental and physical well-being and activity and participation.

Keywords
Humans, Life Style, Stroke Rehabilitation, Stroke
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20740 (URN)37668116 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-11-08 Created: 2023-11-08 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Andersson, J., Jakobsson, S., Rejnö, Å., Hansson, P., Nielsen, S. J. & Björck, L. (2022). Decision‐Making in Seeking Emergency Care for Stroke Symptoms. Stroke: Vascular and Interventional Neurology, 2(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision‐Making in Seeking Emergency Care for Stroke Symptoms
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2022 (English)In: Stroke: Vascular and Interventional Neurology, E-ISSN 2694-5746, Vol. 2, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Previous studies have shown that rapid treatment for stroke, especially ischemic stroke, reduces mortality and disability. The focus has mainly been on reducing time from arrival at hospital to start of treatment. However, the main reason for delay is often time from symptom onset to arrival at hospital. This study therefore aimed to explore decision‐making processes after the onset of stroke symptoms in patients experiencing a first‐time stroke.

Methods

We included 36 patients aged 18 and older, all of whom were hospitalized with a first‐time stroke between October 2018 and April 2020. All patients were interviewed once within 4 weeks of symptom onset and before hospital discharge. Eligible patients were identified retrospectively through a targeted review of medical records. The data were collected and analyzed according to the grounded theory methodology.

Results

In total, 43 potential patients were identified and asked to participate. Overall, 36 patients were included in the study: 17 women (median age 77.0 years, interquartile range 17.5) and 19 men (median age 65.7 years, interquartile range 17.2). All interviewees felt fear, and this affected their decision to seek emergency care. The decision‐making processes were described by the core category of “Acting on fear.” The reason for feeling frightened determined the actions taken. The reasons were sorted into 3 main categories: (1) “seeking care”–recognized stroke symptoms and acted immediately; (2) “pending and reluctance”–suspected stroke but awaited to seek care; and (3) “seeking an explanation”–confused by symptoms.

Conclusion

We found that decision‐making when experiencing stroke symptoms was complex. All patients felt fear, which determined their actions. Some patients knew about stroke symptoms and acted immediately. Others suspected stroke but still chose to wait, whereas others were confused and tried to find answers. These results could contribute to form future awareness campaigns.

Keywords
decision‐making, grounded theory, prehospital delay, qualitative methodology, stroke symptoms
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19711 (URN)10.1161/svin.122.000376 (DOI)001156574700016 ()
Available from: 2023-03-01 Created: 2023-03-01 Last updated: 2024-04-09
Seitl, C. & Rejnö, Å. (2022). Marketing of educational programs: a study of Swedish universities through presented images. Journal of Marketing for Higher Education, 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marketing of educational programs: a study of Swedish universities through presented images
2022 (English)In: Journal of Marketing for Higher Education, ISSN 0884-1241, E-ISSN 1540-7144, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marketing of higher education through images sends a messageabout the targeted audience. Our aim was to investigate normsand representation in marketing images on the websites of higher education institutions. Critical visual methodology was used to study images from Swedish higher education programs in engineering, economics, and nursing. The results show are production of already existing notions on societal norms and educational structure,  i.e. that typical male-  and  female-dominated programs are still cemented in their thinking about the students targeted. Present study show that there is a potentially untapped opportunity to influence future inequality in both the labor market and in higher education  throughmarketing. Imaging in marketing of higher education should therefore be well thought through and permeated by the pursuit of diversity in visual representations, so that stereotypical and norm-preserving images are avoided. Images that are more inclusive and show a greater variety of motif are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2022
Keywords
Critical visual methodology; images; inclusion; marketing; norms and representation
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19512 (URN)10.1080/08841241.2022.2158988 (DOI)000902222600001 ()2-s2.0-85145274447 (Scopus ID)
Note

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.

Available from: 2023-01-02 Created: 2023-01-02 Last updated: 2024-04-09
Palmryd, L., Rejnö, Å. & Godskesen, T. E. (2021). Integrity at end of life in the intensive care unit: a qualitative study of nurses' views.. Annals of Intensive Care, 11(1), 1-10, Article ID 23.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrity at end of life in the intensive care unit: a qualitative study of nurses' views.
2021 (English)In: Annals of Intensive Care, ISSN 2110-5820, E-ISSN 2110-5820, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Integrity is a core value for delivering ethical health care. However, there is a lack of precision in defining what integrity is and how nurses understand it. In the setting of nurses caring for critically ill and dying patients in intensive care units (ICUs), integrity has not received much attention. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how nurses perceive and maintain the integrity of patients during end-of-life care in the ICU setting.

METHODS: This study had a qualitative descriptive design. Data were collected using individual semi-structured interviews with 16 intensive care nurses working at ICUs in four Swedish hospitals. The data were analysed by applying qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: Five overall categories were explored: seeing the unique individual; sensitive to patient vulnerability; observant of patients' physical and mental sphere; perceptive of patients' religion and culture; and being respectful during patient encounters. Many nurses found it difficult to define integrity and to explain what respecting integrity entails in the daily care of dying patients. They often used notions associated with respect and patient-centred attitudes, such as listening and being sensitive or by trying to describe good care. Integrity was nonetheless seen as a central value for their clinical work and a precondition for ethical nursing practice. Some nurses were concerned about patient integrity, which is at risk of being "wiped out" due to the patient's illness/injury, unfamiliarity with the ICU environment and utter dependence on others for care. Protecting patients from harm and reducing patient vulnerability were also seen as important and a way to maintain the integrity of patients.

CONCLUSIONS: The study results show that even though integrity is a fundamental ethical concept and a core value in nursing, ethical codes and guidelines are not always helpful in clinical situations in the end-of-life care of ICU patients. Hence, opportunities must regularly be made available for ICU nurses to reflect on and discuss ethical issues in terms of their decision-making and behaviour.

Keywords
End-of-life, Ethics, Integrity, Intensive care, Nursing care, Palliative, Privacy, Qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-16331 (URN)10.1186/s13613-021-00802-y (DOI)000617435000001 ()33544309 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85100547489 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-25 Created: 2021-02-25 Last updated: 2022-01-20Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, A., Skogsberg, J. & Rejnö, Å. (2021). Oral health plays second fiddle in palliative care: an interview study with registered nurses in home healthcare. BMC Palliative Care, 20(1), Article ID 173.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral health plays second fiddle in palliative care: an interview study with registered nurses in home healthcare
2021 (English)In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Oral health is crucial to the experience of well-being, and symptoms from the mouth are common at the end of life. Palliative care aims to identify and treat symptoms early to avoid unnecessary suffering and is thus an important part of nursing in home healthcare. The aim of this study was to illustrate the professional reflections of registered nurses about oral health amongst patients in palliative care, who are being cared for in a home healthcare setting.

Results: The results showed oral health in end-of-life care, to be an area marked by responsibility and ethical considerations. This was seen in all four partly overlapping themes that emerged through the analysis: Oral health is easily overlooked in palliative care, Oral health is everybody’s but in reality nobody’s responsibility, Patient integrity can be an obstacle for oral health, and Focus on oral health is urgently needed. The mouth is often not included as part of the daily basic care routine, by the registered nurses and the home healthcare staff, until the patient is near end of life. Moreover, neither does the patient tell about symptoms from the mouth. The interpreted whole indicates that the registered nurses had a bad conscience about not doing what they are actually responsible for and ought to do.

Conclusion: The oral health of patients at the end of life risks being forgotten or falling between the cracks, due to the nurses’ scattered tasks and unclear delimitations between their, and other professionals’ responsibilities. The responsibilities of registered nurses are also ethically demanding, since their intent to respect the patient’s integrity could mean that in some cases the patients does not allow them to help with oral health. To reduce the risk that oral health is overlooked, clearer demarcation and guidelines on the division of responsibilities are required. Routines that clearly implement early and recurring oral health assessments in home healthcare as well as continuing education updates on oral health and oral care are also needed.

Keywords
General Medicine, Community care, Content analysis, End of life, Home healthcare, Oral health, Palliative care, Registered nurses
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17763 (URN)10.1186/s12904-021-00859-3 (DOI)000716434300001 ()2-s2.0-85118799058 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access funding provided by University West

Available from: 2021-11-15 Created: 2021-11-15 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Forsgren Gebring, S., Christensson, T., Rudolfsson, G. & Rejnö, Å. (2021). To Attend or Not: The Reasoning Behind Nursing Students' Attendance at Lectures : A Qualitative Study. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 65(3), 500-509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To Attend or Not: The Reasoning Behind Nursing Students' Attendance at Lectures : A Qualitative Study
2021 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 500-509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a rising tendency for students in higher education not to attend lectures. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe the reasoning behind nursing students’ decisions on whether or not to attend lectures. This qualitative study was performed in a nursing education programme at a Swedish University. One hundred and thirty-one students participated. Data were collected through a questionnaire comprising open-ended questions. Qualitative content analysis was performed. The results are presented in eight categories: four concerning reasons for attending lectures and four concerning reasons for not attending lectures. Decisions, both to attend and to not attend lectures, were based on conscious choices guided by the students’ self-governing of their own personal needs for learning. © 2020, © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords
Attendance, choice, nursing education, student reasoning, qualitative method
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-15045 (URN)10.1080/00313831.2020.1727004 (DOI)000514508600001 ()2-s2.0-85079709427 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-16 Created: 2020-03-16 Last updated: 2022-01-19Bibliographically approved
Rejnö, Å., Ternestedt, B.-M., Nordenfelt, L., Silfverberg, G. & Godskesen, T. E. (2020). Dignity at stake: Caring for persons with impaired autonomy. Nursing Ethics, 27(1), 104-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dignity at stake: Caring for persons with impaired autonomy
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2020 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 104-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dignity, usually considered an essential ethical value in healthcare, is a relatively complex, multifaceted concept. However, healthcare professionals often have only a vague idea of what it means to respect dignity when providing care, especially for persons with impaired autonomy. This article focuses on two concepts of dignity, human dignity and dignity of identity, and aims to analyse how these concepts can be applied in the care for persons with impaired autonomy and in furthering the practice of respect and protection from harm. Three vignettes were designed to illustrate typical caring situations involving patients with mild to severely impaired autonomy, including patients with cognitive impairments. In situations like these, there is a risk of the patient's dignity being disrespected and violated. The vignettes were then analysed with respect to the two concepts of dignity to find out whether this approach can illuminate what is at stake in these situations and to provide an understanding of which measures could safeguard the dignity of these patients. The analysis showed that there are profound ethical challenges in the daily care of persons with impaired autonomy. We suggest that these two concepts of human dignity could help guide healthcare professionals to develop practical skills in person-centred, ethically grounded care, where the patient's wishes and needs are the starting point.

Keywords
Caring, cognitive impairment, dignity, theoretical analysis, vignettes
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14737 (URN)10.1177/0969733019845128 (DOI)000510996500010 ()2-s2.0-85079017638 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funders: Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development (06-1045); the foundation for Gösta Svensson’s memory; Agneta Prytz Folkes and Go¨sta Folkes Foundation.

Available from: 2019-12-06 Created: 2019-12-06 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6454-9575

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