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Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Kapetanovic, S. & Turner, R. (2024). Interplay between Parental Knowledge and Adolescent Inebriation, and Their Links to Parent–Child Relationships over Time. Youth, 4(1), 163-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interplay between Parental Knowledge and Adolescent Inebriation, and Their Links to Parent–Child Relationships over Time
2024 (English)In: Youth, E-ISSN 2673-995X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While parental knowledge of adolescents’ whereabouts is generally considered to be a key protective factor for adolescent alcohol use, the developmental links during adolescence are unclear. Focusing on within-family processes on a sample of Swedish early to late adolescents (n = 782; 49% female) over four waves of data, we (1) tested the interplay between parental knowledge and adolescent alcohol inebriation, (2) investigated whether changes over time in parental knowledge and adolescent inebriation were linked to the parent–child relationship, and (3) tested the moderating role of adolescent gender and SES on these potential links. The results from random intercept cross-lagged panel models showed that increases in parental knowledge predicted decreases in frequencies of adolescent inebriation the following year as well a more positive parent–child relationship over time. Increases in adolescent inebriation were predicted by less parental knowledge only in late adolescence. These links were not moderated by adolescent gender or SES. The results emphasize the importance of increasing parental knowledge of adolescent activities in order to reduce adolescent involvement in heavy alcohol use as well as the importance of parent–child closeness.

Keywords
parental knowledge; parent–child relationships; adolescence; alcohol use; inebriation; RI-CLPM
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21229 (URN)10.3390/youth4010012 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 259–2012-25
Note

CC BY 4.0

Available from: 2024-02-02 Created: 2024-02-02 Last updated: 2024-02-26
Gurdal, S., Kapetanovic, S., Einarsson, I., Boson, K. & Claesdotter-Knutsson, E. (2023). Adolescents’ Perceptions of a Relapse Prevention Treatment for Problematic Gaming: A Qualitative Study. Healthcare, 11(17), 2366-2366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents’ Perceptions of a Relapse Prevention Treatment for Problematic Gaming: A Qualitative Study
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2023 (English)In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 11, no 17, p. 2366-2366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Given the increasing prevalence of problematic gaming, in 2013, the diagnosis “Internetgaming disorder (IGD)” was included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) as a potential diagnosis. With a new diagnosis, it is important to determine treatment options. The importance of the parent–child relationship has been emphasised in problematic gaming and its treatment. This study aims to provide more knowledge about adolescents’ perceptions of a treatment for problematic gaming and understand whether such treatment may have a bearing on the parent–child relationship. We conducted individual interviews with nine adolescents who completed a treatment for problematic gaming. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed three themes.

Theme 1: adolescents’ experiences of the new treatment;

Theme 2: adolescents’ perceptions of the effect of the treatment on their gaming behaviour; and

Theme 3: adolescents’ perceptions of changes in their parent–child relationships.

The adolescents viewed the treatment as a way of gaining control of their gaming, a process in which a therapist played an integral part. For the majority of the adolescents in our study, the main effects of treatment were gaining insight into how their gaming and gaming-related behaviours affected other parts of their lives. The participants felt that the treatment improved their relationship with their parents through reducing everyday conflicts. This new knowledge can be used for the development of future interventions involving children and adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
treatment; problematic gaming; gaming disorder; interviews; children
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20656 (URN)10.3390/healthcare11172366 (DOI)001060543700001 ()37685400 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85170359916 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2021-01696
Note

CC-BY 4.0

Available from: 2023-09-01 Created: 2023-09-01 Last updated: 2024-01-08
Olsson, T. M., Kapetanovic, S., Hollertz, K., Starke, M. & Skoog, T. (2023). Advancing Social Intervention Research Through Program Theory Reconstruction. Research on social work practice, 642-655, Article ID 104973152211499.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advancing Social Intervention Research Through Program Theory Reconstruction
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2023 (English)In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, p. 642-655, article id 104973152211499Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Program theory reconstruction is an often-overlooked aspect of social intervention research. In this paper, we argue that intervention research benefits if the research design is informed by the specific intervention's program theory (i.e., the idea of how the intervention is supposed to lead to the intended outcomes). The purpose of this paper is to offer a comprehensive and accessible guide to program theory reconstruction in research on social interventions and to provide arguments as to how program theory reconstruction can be used to benefit intervention studies. First, we summarize what program theory is and its role in intervention research. Second, we provide a direct “how-to” for researchers, practitioners, and students who may be unfamiliar with the methods of program theory reconstruction but are interested in undertaking a program theory reconstruction. Finally, we conclude with how program theory reconstruction can benefit intervention research.

Keywords
program theory reconstruction, logic model, program evaluation, program development, intervention
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19534 (URN)10.1177/10497315221149976 (DOI)000908687400001 ()2-s2.0-85146092693 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2018-01324Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-05-20
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2024-01-08
Gurdal, S., Bacikova-Sleskova, M., Kapetanovic, S., Erlandsson, S. & Sorbring, E. (2023). Community series in the consequences of COVID-19 on the mental well-being of parents, children and adolescents, volume II: Editorial. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 14, 1-2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community series in the consequences of COVID-19 on the mental well-being of parents, children and adolescents, volume II: Editorial
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14, p. 1-2Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Keywords
COVID-19, emotional distress, education, social distancing, isolation, family
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20616 (URN)10.3389/fpsyt.2023.1249748 (DOI)37496688 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165889926 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC-BY

Available from: 2023-08-22 Created: 2023-08-22 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Clausén Gull, I., Kapetanovic, S., Norman, Å., Ferrer-Wreder, L., Olsson, T. M. & Eninger, L. (2023). Neighborhood conditions in a Swedish context: Two studies of reliability and validity of virtual systematic social observation using Google Street View. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, 1-16, Article ID 1020742.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neighborhood conditions in a Swedish context: Two studies of reliability and validity of virtual systematic social observation using Google Street View
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, p. 1-16, article id 1020742Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The goal of these studies was to investigate the reliability and validity of virtual systematic social observation (virtual SSO) using Google Street View in a Swedish neighborhood context.

METHODS: This was accomplished in two studies. Study 1 focused on interrater reliability and construct validity, comparing ratings conducted in-person to those done using Google Street View, across 24 study sites within four postal code areas. Study 2 focused on criterion validity of virtual SSO in terms of neighborhoods with low versus high income levels, including 133 study sites within 22 postal code areas in a large Swedish city. In both studies, assessment of the neighborhood context was conducted at each study site, using a protocol adapted to a Swedish context.

RESULTS: Scales for Physical Decay, Neighborhood Dangerousness, and Physical Disorder were found to be reliable, with adequate interrater reliability, high consistency across methods, and high internal consistency. In Study 2, significantly higher levels of observed Physical Decay, Neighborhood Dangerousness, and signs of garbage or litter were observed in postal codes areas (site data was aggregated to postal code level) with lower as compared to higher income levels.

DISCUSSION: We concluded that the scales within the virtual SSO with Google Street View protocol that were developed in this series of studies represents a reliable and valid measure of several key neighborhood contextual features. Implications for understanding the complex person-context interactions central to many theories of positive development among youth were discussed in relation to the study findings.

Keywords
Google street view, child and youth development, contextual resources, developmental assets, neighborhoods, observational method, systematic social observation
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19808 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1020742 (DOI)000929112600001 ()36777218 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147745035 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY

Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2024-01-10
Kapetanovic, S., Zietz, S., Lansford, J. E., Bacchini, D., Bornstein, M. H., Chang, L., . . . Al-Hassan, S. M. (2023). Parenting, Adolescent Sensation Seeking, and Subsequent Substance Use: Moderation by Adolescent Temperament. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 52(6), 1235-1254
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parenting, Adolescent Sensation Seeking, and Subsequent Substance Use: Moderation by Adolescent Temperament
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1235-1254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although previous research has identified links between parenting and adolescent substance use, little is known about therole of adolescent individual processes, such as sensation seeking, and temperamental tendencies for such links. To testtenets from biopsychosocial models of adolescent risk behavior and differential susceptibility theory, this study investigatedlongitudinal associations among positive and harsh parenting, adolescent sensation seeking, and substance use and testedwhether the indirect associations were moderated by adolescent temperament, including activation control, frustration,sadness, and positive emotions. Longitudinal data reported by adolescents (n = 892; 49.66% girls) and their mothers fromeight cultural groups when adolescents were ages 12, 13, and 14 were used. A moderated mediation model showed thatparenting was related to adolescent substance use, both directly and indirectly, through sensation seeking. Indirectassociations were moderated by adolescent temperament. This study advances understanding of the developmental pathsbetween the contextual and individual factors critical for adolescent substance use across a wide range of cultural contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
Adolescents, Sensation seeking, Parenting, Substance use, Temperament
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19862 (URN)10.1007/s10964-023-01765-y (DOI)000955804800003 ()2-s2.0-85150660988 (Scopus ID)
Note

This article is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 4.0 International License, 

This research has been funded by NICHD grant RO1-HD054805 and Fogarty International Center grant RO3-TW008141. This research also was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH/NICHD, USA, and the Centre for the Evaluation of Development Policies (EDePO) at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London, UK, funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 695300-HKADeC-ERC-2015-AdG). Open access funding provided by University West.

Available from: 2023-04-18 Created: 2023-04-18 Last updated: 2024-01-10
André, F., Kapetanovic, S., Einarsson, I., Trebbin Harvard, S., Franzén, L., Möttus, A., . . . Claesdotter-Knutsson, E. (2023). Relapse prevention therapy for internet gaming disorder in Swedish child and adolescent psychiatric clinics: a randomized controlled trial. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relapse prevention therapy for internet gaming disorder in Swedish child and adolescent psychiatric clinics: a randomized controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of relapse prevention (RP) as a treatment for internet gaming disorder (IGD).

Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Three child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) units in Region Skåne, Sweden.

Participants: Children aged 13-18 years, coming for their first visit to CAP during 2022, were screened for gaming behavior. Those who met the proposed DSM-5 criteria for IGD were offered participation in the trial, if they had the capacity to provide written informed consent and if they spoke Swedish. A total of 111 CAP patients agreed to participate. Out of those, 11 patients were excluded due to incorrect inclusion such as young age (n = 1), or due to the absence of responses to follow-up measures (n = 9). After exclusion, 102 participants remained (intervention = 47, control = 55).

Interventions: The intervention, RP, is based on cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) and was provided individually, comprising of five to seven 45-min sessions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks versus treatment as usual.

Outcome measures: Participants were assessed with Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents pre-treatment (GASA) (baseline), post-treatment (treatment group only), and 3 months after baseline (follow-up).

Results: The repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant interaction effect between treatment and time. Both the control group and treatment group lowered their mean GASA score from baseline to follow-up significantly, but the improvement was greater in the treatment group (mean difference in control group -5.1, p < 0.001, 95% CI = - 3.390 to -6.755, mean difference in treatment group -9.9, p < 0.001, 95% CI = -11.746 to -8.105).

Conclusion: RP was found to be superior to treatment as usual in terms of reduction of IGD symptoms. Future research should address which aspects within a given treatment are effective, who benefits from treatment, in what aspects, and why.

Keywords
CBT; GASA; gaming; internet gaming disorder; relapse prevention
National Category
Applied Psychology Psychiatry
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21030 (URN)10.3389/fpsyt.2023.1256413 (DOI)001098039800001 ()37928925 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175861055 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY

Available from: 2023-12-27 Created: 2023-12-27 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Kapetanovic, S., Gurdal, S., Einarsson, I., Werner, M., André, F., Håkansson, A. & Claesdotter-Knutsson, E. (2023). Relapse Prevention Therapy for Problem Gaming or Internet Gaming Disorder in Swedish Child and Youth Psychiatric Clinics: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Research Protocols, 12, e44318-e44318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relapse Prevention Therapy for Problem Gaming or Internet Gaming Disorder in Swedish Child and Youth Psychiatric Clinics: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
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2023 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 12, p. e44318-e44318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Although gaming is a common arena where children socialize, an increasing number of children are exhibiting signs of problem gaming or internet gaming disorder. An important factor to the development of problem gaming is parent-child relationships. A cognitive behavioral therapy-based form of treatment, labeled relapse prevention, has been developed as a treatment for child and adolescent problem gaming or internet gaming disorder. However, no study has evaluated the effect of this treatment among Swedish children and youth nor the role of the parent-child relationships in this treatment.

Objective:

This study aims (1) to evaluate a relapse prevention treatment for patients showing signs of problem gaming or internet gaming disorder recruited from child and youth psychiatric clinics and (2) to test whether the quality of parent-child relationships plays a role in the effect of relapse prevention treatment and vice versa-whether the relapse prevention treatment has a spillover effect on the quality of parent-child relationships. Moreover, we explore the carer's attitudes about parent-child relationships and child gaming, as well as experiences of the treatment among the children, their carers, and the clinicians who carried out the treatment.

Methods:

This study is a 2-arm, parallel-group, early-stage randomized controlled trial with embedded qualitative components. Children aged 12-18 years who meet the criteria for problem gaming or internet gaming disorder will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either intervention (relapse prevention treatment) or control (treatment as usual), with a total of 160 (80 + 80) participants. The primary outcomes are measures of gaming and gambling behavior before and after intervention, and the secondary outcomes include child ratings of parent-child communication and family functioning. The study is supplemented with a qualitative component with semistructured interviews to capture participants' and clinicians' experiences of the relapse prevention, as well as attitudes about parent-child relationships and parenting needs in carers whose children completed the treatment.

Results:

The trial started in January 2022 and is expected to end in December 2023. The first results are expected in March 2023.

Conclusions:

This study will be the first randomized controlled trial evaluating relapse prevention as a treatment for child and adolescent problem gaming and internet gaming disorder in Sweden. Since problem behaviors in children interact with the family context, investigating parent-child relationships adjacent to the treatment of child problem gaming and internet gaming disorder is an important strength of the study. Further, different parties, ie, children, carers, and clinicians, will be directly or indirectly involved in the evaluation of the treatment, providing more knowledge of the treatment and its effect. Limitations include comorbidity in children with problem gaming and internet gaming disorder and challenges with the recruitment of participants.

Keywords
internet gaming disorder; parent-child relationship; problem gaming; psychiatry; psychology; randomized controlled trial; relapse prevention; treatment
National Category
Applied Psychology Psychiatry Social Work
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-20873 (URN)10.2196/44318 (DOI)000961969500004 ()36602846 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85149106269 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05506384 (retrospectively registered); https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05506384.

International registered report identifier (irrid): DERR1-10.2196/44318.

The data sets generated and/or analyzed during the current study are not publicly available because this study’s ethical review does not allow for study data to be in a public repository. Requests to access the datasets should be addressed to ECK or SK.

Available from: 2023-10-30 Created: 2023-10-30 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Kapetanovic, S. (2023). Spelar områdets ekonomiska resurser roll för effekten av en strukturerad tidig insats för barn i förskolan?. In: Abstracts för DecemberkonferensenInstitutionen för individ och samhälle 13 december 2023, Trollhättan, Sweden: . Paper presented at Decemberkonferensen Institutionen för individ och samhälle 13 december 2023, Trollhättan, Sweden (pp. 1-1). Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spelar områdets ekonomiska resurser roll för effekten av en strukturerad tidig insats för barn i förskolan?
2023 (Swedish)In: Abstracts för DecemberkonferensenInstitutionen för individ och samhälle 13 december 2023, Trollhättan, Sweden, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2023, p. 1-1Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) en tidig insats som syftar till att främja socioemotionell kompetens (SEK) bland barn i förskolan. Syftet med studien var att undersöka 1) potentiella skillnader med avseende på aspekter av SEK som finns bland barn i skolor områden med olika ekonomiska resurser (hög/låg) och 2) om effekten av PATHS på barns SEK kan skiljas åt beroende på ekonomiska resurser i området. N = 275 barn (år 4–5) randomiserades i intervention och kontrollgrupp (RCT-design) där 42.0 % av barnen gick i förskola i ekonomiskt utsatt område. Vi fann att 1) barn i ekonomiskt utsatta områden uppvisade bristande exekutiva färdigheter (inkl arbetsminne och uppmärksamhet) som är aspekter av SEK; 2) Pedagogers arbete med PATHS var gynnsamt på olika sätt för barn i olika områden, men PATHS var särskilt gynnsam för barns sociala och kognitiva aspekter av SEK bland barn i ekonomiskt utsatta områden.

Kapetanovic, S., Ginner Hau, H., Eichas, K., Olsson, T. M., Ferrer-Wreder, L., & Eninger, L. (2022, September). Does attending preschool in an economically advantaged or disadvantaged neighborhood moderate the effects of the preschool edition of promoting alternative thinking strategies®?. In Frontiers in Education (Vol. 7, p. 978662).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst, 2023
Keywords
barn, förskola, ekonomi
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-21113 (URN)
Conference
Decemberkonferensen Institutionen för individ och samhälle 13 december 2023, Trollhättan, Sweden
Available from: 2023-12-21 Created: 2023-12-21 Last updated: 2023-12-21
Olsson, T. M., Enebrink, P., Kapetanovic, S., Ferrer-Wreder, L., Stålnacke, J., Eninger, L., . . . Sedem, M. (2023). Study protocol for a non-randomized controlled trial of the effects of internet-based parent training as a booster to the preschool edition of PATHS®: Universal edition of the Parent Web. PLOS ONE, 18(4), e0284926-e0284926
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Study protocol for a non-randomized controlled trial of the effects of internet-based parent training as a booster to the preschool edition of PATHS®: Universal edition of the Parent Web
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2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 4, p. e0284926-e0284926Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Well implemented, universal parental support is often effective in families with younger children, but research on their effects on families with adolescent children is scarce. In this study, a trial of the universal parent training intervention “Parent Web” in early adolescence is added to the social emotional learning intervention Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS®), completed in early childhood. The Parent Web is a universal online parenting intervention based on social learning theory. The intervention aims to promote positive parenting and family interaction through five weekly modules completed over 6–8 weeks.The main hypothesis is that participants in the intervention group will exhibit significant pre to post- intervention-related benefits relative participants in the comparison group.

The aims of this study are: 1) provide Parent Web as a booster aimed at improving parenting support and practices at the transition into adolescence to a cohort of parents whose children have previously participated in preschool PATHS, and 2) examine the effects of the universal edition of Parent Web. The study has a quasi-experimental design with pre- and post-testing.The incremental effects of this internet-delivered parent training intervention are tested in parents of early adolescents (11–13 years) who participated in PATHS when 4–5 years old compared to a matched sample of adolescents with no prior experience of PATHS. The primary outcomes are parent reported child behavior and family relationships. Secondary outcomes include self-reported parent health and stress. The proposed study is one of the few trials to test the effects of universal parental support in families of early adolescents and will therefore contribute to the understanding of how mental health in children and young people can be promoted across developmental periods through a continuum of universal measures.

Trial registration: Clinical trials.gov (NCT05172297), prospectively registered on December 29, 2021.

Keywords
Adolescent; Child; Child Behavior; Child, Preschool; Humans; Internet; Mental Health; Parent-Child Relations; Parenting; Parents
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19930 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0284926 (DOI)37104280 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85154598705 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, STYA-2019/ 0005Stockholm County Council, FoUI-940010Stockholm County Council, FoUI-968003
Note

CC BY

Data Availability Statement:

This study will adhere to the ethical guidelines (including data availability) that were approved for this project by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (Dnr 2021-04552) and will be consistent with guidelines regarding data security including GDPR. Approved ethical review does not allow for public repository archiving of the study data due to personally sensitive and identifying data. Qualified researchers (e.g., Ph.D.) who have ethical permission under Swedish law for secondary data analysis of this dataset can apply to access de-identified data in writing (6 months poststudy completion date). Written requests should be directed to the PATHS/Parent Web Data Management Committee at PATHS_PW. Project@psychology.su.se

Available from: 2023-05-10 Created: 2023-05-10 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2998-7289

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