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Hällgren Graneheim, UllaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0208-4343
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Löyttynen, J., Hällgren Graneheim, U. & Hörnsten, Å. (2023). District Nurses' Experiences of Practice in Caring for People with Mental Ill-Health in Swedish Primary Care.. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 44(5), 396-405
Open this publication in new window or tab >>District Nurses' Experiences of Practice in Caring for People with Mental Ill-Health in Swedish Primary Care.
2023 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental ill-health is one of the greatest public health challenges in Sweden, and it is estimated that every third person seeking primary care in the country suffers from mental ill-health. Without proper treatment at an early stage, mental ill-health may lead to long-term illness and have a significant impact on functional ability. As district nurses are specialists in public health nursing, they have been pointed out as having a key role in the prevention and management of mental ill-health. The aim was to explore district nurses' practice in caring for people with mental ill-health within primary health care. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with district nurses (n = 18) and the transcribed text was subjected to qualitative content analysis. The result was formulated as several subthemes, eventually developed into three themes: Practicing within an organisation where traditional attitudes are impediments, Perceiving mental healthcare as not being an obvious part of district nursing, Working as fellow human beings rather than "professionals". The findings indicate that district nurses feel uncertainty in their practice in this area. Working independently with mental ill-health was not always considered socially acceptable among district nurses. Despite these challenges they tried to remain involved without becoming emotionally overwhelmed. They also strived to meet the needs of these patients with 'small things', that could be effective and a part of recovery-oriented practice, even if they might be defined as unprofessional, and their efficacy negated.

Keywords
district nurse, patients, mental ill-health, primary care, sweden
National Category
Nursing General Practice Psychiatry
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19877 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2023.2193639 (DOI)000972232100001 ()37053044 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85152958560 (Scopus ID)
Note

This  is  an  Open  access  article  distributed  under  the  terms  of  the  Creative  Commons  attribution-non Commercial-no Derivatives  license  (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Available from: 2023-04-21 Created: 2023-04-21 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Hällgren Graneheim, U. & Skyvell Nilsson, M. (2022). Newly-graduated nurses´ work-integrated learning: A qualitative study from an educational and occupational perspective. Nurse Education in Practice, 59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Newly-graduated nurses´ work-integrated learning: A qualitative study from an educational and occupational perspective
2022 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe newly graduated nurses´(NGNs´) experience of work-integrated learning (WIL), from an educational and occupational perspective.

Background: NGNs often find themselves unprepared to meet occupational demands on their competence on entering working life, and express difficulties integrating educational theory into a practical context. Qualitative and effective WIL becomes particularly important for NGNs to develop the competence required to handle the transition from education to working life.

Design: This is a qualitative, descriptive study with an inductive approach.

Methods: Seven focus-group discussions were performed and subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Results: The results revealed that WIL for NGNs includes personal mastering of several professional roles: a self-directed and collaborative learning role, a relational nursing role, and a transition from a student role to a collegial role. Furthermore, WIL entails adapting to organisational requirements, including development of contextual workplace knowledge and understanding; striving for confidence in medical-technical performance; and developing an experience-based understanding of clinical situations.

Conclusion: The results reveal that WIL is complex, encompassing adaptation to roles and personal capabilities that increase new graduates´competence and preparation for work. In addition, WIL requires personal commitment to one’s own learning as well as organisational and social support. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2022
Keywords
Focus group discussions, Nursing education, Professional development, Transition, Qualitative content analysis, Work-based learning, Work-integrated learning
National Category
Nursing Learning Work Sciences
Research subject
Work Integrated Learning; NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-18167 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2022.103290 (DOI)000820271300008 ()35038660 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85123588549 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2023-05-17
Molin, J. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2022). Participation, Confirmation and Challenges: How Nursing Staff Experience the Daily Conversations Nursing Intervention in Psychiatric Inpatient Care. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 43(11), 1056-1063
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation, Confirmation and Challenges: How Nursing Staff Experience the Daily Conversations Nursing Intervention in Psychiatric Inpatient Care
2022 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 1056-1063Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental health nursing focuses on patients’ experiences, accessed through narratives developed in conversations with nursing staff. This study explored nursing staff’s experiences of using the nursing intervention Daily Conversations in psychiatric inpatient care. We used a qualitative questionnaire and received 103 responses. Qualitative content analysis of the data resulted in three themes describing both advantages and obstacles with Daily Conversations: Promotes participation, Contributes to confirming relations and Challenges previous structures. To illuminate the significance of confirming acts and make nursing staff more comfortable, the intervention could benefit from being more flexible and allowing in its structure. For the intervention to succeed, nursing staff need training in conversation, thorough preparation, shared reflections on values in mental health nursing, and structures to maintain its implementation and use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Psychiatric care, nursing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-19203 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2022.2116135 (DOI)000849529000001 ()2-s2.0-85137665095 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-26 Created: 2022-09-26 Last updated: 2023-03-20
Lindgren, B.-M., Molin, J. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2021). Balancing between a Person-Centred and a Common Staff Approach: Nursing Staff's Experiences of Good Nursing Practice for Patients Who Self-Harm. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 42(6), 564-572
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing between a Person-Centred and a Common Staff Approach: Nursing Staff's Experiences of Good Nursing Practice for Patients Who Self-Harm
2021 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 564-572Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe nursing staff's experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric in-patient care for patients with self-harming behavior. The participants were nine nurses and eight nursing assistants working in two in-patient wards in general psychiatry. Four focus group discussions were held and subjected to qualitative content analysis. The findings showed that good nursing practice balanced a person-centred approach with a common staff approach, allowing people who self-harm and staff to share responsibility for structuring everyday life, keeping to the plan, communicating decisions, and finding individual opportunities for relief. Reflective discussions among the staff concerning prejudice, emotional stress, lack of resources, and shortcomings in care planning could also prevent a stigmatizing culture and organizational deficiencies, which would be beneficial for both the people who self-harm and the staff.

Keywords
self-harming behavior, self-harm, nursing, staff, experience, psychiatric in-patient care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-15904 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2020.1817206 (DOI)000569999500001 ()2-s2.0-85091093794 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-01 Created: 2020-10-01 Last updated: 2022-01-19Bibliographically approved
Ljunggren, S., Winblad, S., Hällgren Graneheim, U., Malmgren, K. & Ozanne, A. (2021). Experiences of emotional and psychosocial functioning after frontal lobe resection for epilepsy.. Epilepsy & Behavior, 121(Pt A), Article ID 108077.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of emotional and psychosocial functioning after frontal lobe resection for epilepsy.
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2021 (English)In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 121, no Pt A, article id 108077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Frontal lobe resection (FLR) is the second most common epilepsy surgery procedure in adults. Few studies address neuropsychological consequences after FLR. The aim of this study was to explore patients' and relatives' experiences of cognitive, emotional and social cognitive functioning after frontal lobe epilepsy surgery.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were held with 14 patients having gone through FLR as adults during the years 2000-2016 and 12 of their relatives. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with inductive qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: Positive as well as negative consequences were described both by patients and relatives. Feelings of relief and an increased capacity to experience emotions of well-being were mainly experienced as related to seizure freedom. A newfound autonomy and a more grown-up identity as opposed to a self-image based on epilepsy was also highlighted. However, results also showed that even for seizure free patients, FLR could give rise to negative experiences, the most prominent of which were mental fatigue, lowered mood and social withdrawal. Coping strategies included planning ahead to avoid mental exhaustion. Over all, respondents considered that the epilepsy surgery had been a risk well worth taking and that positive consequences outweighed the negative ones.

CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a range of positive as well as negative outcomes after FLR for epilepsy. The findings indicate that lowered mood and mental fatigue could affect the life situation in a negative way, regardless of seizure outcome. This is important to consider in the preoperative counselling of patients and their families, as well as in the postsurgical follow-up. It is also crucial that the epilepsy surgery team has the possibility to offer rehabilitation and support to families regarding these aspects after surgery.

Keywords
Emotional function, Frontal lobe epilepsy surgery, Psychosocial function, Qualitative content analysis
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-17416 (URN)10.1016/j.yebeh.2021.108077 (DOI)000665746200004 ()34087680 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85107151835 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by grants from the Swedish State under the agreement between the Swedish Government and the County Councils, the ALF-agreement (grant ALFGBG-723151) and from the Gothenburg Foundation for Neurological Research and the Margarethahemmet Foundation.

Available from: 2021-09-09 Created: 2021-09-09 Last updated: 2022-01-19
Molin, J., Vestberg, M., Lövgren, A., Ringnér, A., Hällgren Graneheim, U. & Lindgren, B.-M. (2021). Rather a Competent Practitioner than a Compassionate Healer: Patients' Satisfaction with Interactions in Psychiatric Inpatient Care.. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 42(6), 549-554
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rather a Competent Practitioner than a Compassionate Healer: Patients' Satisfaction with Interactions in Psychiatric Inpatient Care.
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2021 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 549-554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactions with staff are important aspects in patients' experiences of psychiatric inpatient care (PIC). This study aimed to evaluate patients' satisfaction with their interactions with PIC staff and whether sociodemographic factors, depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with their perceptions of these interactions. In this cross-sectional study, we collected data from 84 patients receiving inpatient care in three psychiatric settings in Sweden. The patients' perceptions of interactions with staff and self-reported degrees of depression and anxiety were evaluated through questionnaires. Overall, patients were satisfied with the patient-staff interaction. However, significantly higher scores were related to staffs' practical competence than to their compassion. Older patients reported significantly more satisfaction than younger patients with their most recent meeting with staff. Tailored nursing interventions may improve staff's compassionate capacity. Further research in larger samples is needed to improve our understanding of the factors associated with how patients perceive their interactions with staff.

Keywords
patient, experience, satisfaction, psyciatric inpatient care, PIC, staff, interactions, patient-staff interaction, competence, compassion
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-15938 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2020.1820645 (DOI)000573104800001 ()32975473 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091612887 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funders: Svensk sjuksköterskeförening

Available from: 2020-10-01 Created: 2020-10-01 Last updated: 2022-01-19Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, B.-M., Lundman, B. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2020). Abstraction and interpretation during the qualitative content analysis process. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 108, Article ID 103632.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abstraction and interpretation during the qualitative content analysis process
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 108, article id 103632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Qualitative content analysis and other 'standardised' methods are sometimes considered to be technical tools used for basic, superficial, and simple sorting of text, and their results lack depth, scientific rigour, and evidence. To strengthen the trustworthiness of qualitative content analyses, we focus on abstraction and interpretation during the analytic process. To our knowledge, descriptions of these concepts are sparse; this paper therefore aims to elaborate on and exemplify the distinction and relation between abstraction and interpretation during the different phases of the process of qualitative content analysis. We address the relations between abstraction and interpretation when selecting, condensing, and coding meaning units and creating categories and themes on various levels. The examples used are based on our experiences of teaching and supervising students at various levels. We also highlight the phases of de-contextualisation and re-contextualisation in describing the analytic process. We argue that qualitative content analysis can be both descriptive and interpretative. When the data allow interpretations of the latent content, qualitative content analysis reveals both depth and meaning in participants' utterances.

Keywords
Abstraction, De-contextualisation, Interpretation, Qualitative content analysis, Re-contextualisation
National Category
Social Work Pedagogy Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-15713 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2020.103632 (DOI)000541257000011 ()32505813 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85085769949 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-24 Created: 2020-08-24 Last updated: 2020-10-27Bibliographically approved
Molin, J., Hällgren Graneheim, U., Ringnér, A. & Lindgren, B.-M. (2020). Time Together as an arena for mental health nursing: staff experiences of introducing and participating in a nursing intervention in psychiatric inpatient care. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 29(6), 1192-1201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time Together as an arena for mental health nursing: staff experiences of introducing and participating in a nursing intervention in psychiatric inpatient care
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1192-1201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A lack of meaningful activities for people with mental ill health admitted to psychiatric inpatient care has been related to feelings of boredom and 'doing nothing' and is not in line with recovery-oriented care. Staff in psychiatric inpatient care report having limited time, ambiguous responsibilities, and insufficient support that counteracts their ideals of good nursing care and puts them at risk for high levels of stress and stress of conscience. Research highlights a need for interactions between patients and staff, but few nursing interventions with such a focus are described in the literature. This qualitative study aimed to illuminate staff experiences of introducing and participating in the nursing intervention Time Together, via qualitative content analysis of 17 individual semi-structured interviews with nursing staff in psychiatric inpatient care. The results show that these staff members experienced Time Together as an arena for mental health nursing. They prepared for the introduction of the intervention by laying a framework for success. Although the actual implementation led to them feeling burdened, they found that Time Together fostered relationships between patients and staff. For successful implementation, mental health nurses need to advocate the intervention. As Time Together constitutes an arena for mental health nursing, play and conversations based on reciprocity and equality can contribute to patients' recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
Time Together, engagement, mental health nursing, nursing intervention, psychiatric inpatient care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-15710 (URN)10.1111/inm.12759 (DOI)000545809700001 ()32618398 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087428615 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-24 Created: 2020-08-24 Last updated: 2021-02-15Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, B.-M., Ringnér, A., Molin, J. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2019). Patients' experiences of isolation in psychiatric inpatient care: Insights from a meta-ethnographic study.. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 28(1), 7-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' experiences of isolation in psychiatric inpatient care: Insights from a meta-ethnographic study.
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 7-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historically, people with mental ill-health have been isolated from society. Although mental health care has moved from closed to more open forms of care, in many societies care is still provided in locked wards, and people with mental ill-health are sometimes secluded from their fellow patients, families, friends, and visitors. The aim of this study was to illuminate patients' experiences of isolation in psychiatric inpatient care. A systematic review of qualitative research was conducted, and the key findings were subjected to meta-ethnographic synthesis. The findings were twofold: 'being admitted to prison' and 'having access to shelter'. The experience of isolated care as prison-like symbolizes patients' longing for freedom and feeling restricted and limited by rules, stripped of rights, abandoned, controlled, powerless, and unsupported. In contrast, the experience of isolation as shelter symbolizes safety and the opportunity to regain control over one's own situation. A stigmatizing public view holds that people with mental ill-health are dangerous and unpredictable and, therefore, unsafe to themselves and others. Being placed in isolation because these fears contribute to self-stigma among patients. Promoting a sheltered experience in which isolation is used with respect for patients and the reasons are made explicit may encourage recovery. A shift in emphasis in ward culture from observation to engagement is needed to reduce blame, shift patient experiences from prison to shelter, and to support autonomy as a therapeutic intervention.

Keywords
experiences, isolation, locked ward, psychiatric inpatient care, seclusion
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12945 (URN)10.1111/inm.12519 (DOI)000459619300002 ()29975446 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054632749 (Scopus ID)
Note

First published online: 05 July 2018

Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
Ozanne, A., Verdinelli, C., Olsson, I., Edelvik, A., Hällgren Graneheim, U. & Malmgren, K. (2018). Callosotomy in children: Parental experiences reported at long-term follow-up. Epilepsy & Behavior, 86, 91-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Callosotomy in children: Parental experiences reported at long-term follow-up
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2018 (English)In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 86, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Callosotomy is a palliative surgery method for selected individuals with severe, drug-resistant epilepsy. The aim of this retrospective study was to explore parental experiences of the family's life situation before and long after their child had undergone callosotomy. Semistructured interviews of the parents of 12 children were analyzed using a combination of inductive and deductive qualitative content analysis. Before surgery, parents felt that they lived in a chaotic bubble with an unbearable situation; their child had severe and frequent seizures and had to be looked after constantly. Most parents were both satisfied and dissatisfied with the given support and information. However, if the child did not improve after surgery, parents often felt that the information before surgery had not been adequate. After surgery, they found a glimpse of hope. They felt that the family got a new life; the reduced seizure severity led to a better life situation for the family. The support was described as both good and poor. The family life situation was complex, and even if they were partly satisfied with the support, it was still not enough. However, the life situation was also very stressful because of remaining seizures, behavioral problems, and sometimes, adverse effects of surgery. The families lived in disappointment and difficulty and had to fight for their rights. This indicates that these families need more information and social service coordination both before and long after surgery. They need not only tools to manage the child's disabilities but also substantial help to care for the child and to receive the social support they need.

Keywords
Callosotomy, Childhood epilepsy, Epilepsy surgery, Parental experiences, Qualitative content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE, Nursing science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-12868 (URN)10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.06.020 (DOI)000451817900398 ()30153937 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049467111 (Scopus ID)
Note

Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Funders: Margarethahem Foundation; Sahlgrenska Academy,  ALFGBG-429901

Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0208-4343

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