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Fredriksson, Claes
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Bonilla Hernández, A. E., Lu, T., Beno, T., Fredriksson, C. & Jawahir, I. S. (2019). Process sustainability evaluation for manufacturing of a component with the 6R application. Paper presented at Conference of 16th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing, GCSM 2018 ; Conference Date: 2 October 2018 Through 4 October 2018. Procedia Manufacturing, 33, 546-553
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Process sustainability evaluation for manufacturing of a component with the 6R application
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2019 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 33, p. 546-553Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainability in manufacturing can be evaluated at product, process and system levels. The 6R methodology for sustainability enhancement in manufacturing processes includes: reduced use of materials, energy, water and other resources; reusing of products/components; recovery and recycling of materials/components; remanufacturing of products; and redesigning of products to utilize recovered materials/resources. Although manufacturing processes can be evaluated by their productivity, quality and cost, process sustainability assessment makes it a complete evaluation. This paper presents a 6R-based evaluation method for sustainable manufacturing in terms of specific metrics within six major metrics clusters: environmental impact, energy consumption, waste management, cost, resource utilization and society/personnel health/operational safety. Manufacturing processes such as casting, welding, turning, milling, drilling, grinding, etc., can be evaluated using this methodology. A case study for machining processes is presented as an example based on the proposed metrics. © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Production Technology; ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14467 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2019.04.068 (DOI)2-s2.0-85068575451 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Conference of 16th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing, GCSM 2018 ; Conference Date: 2 October 2018 Through 4 October 2018
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-10-01 Created: 2019-10-01 Last updated: 2020-01-27Bibliographically approved
Fredriksson, C. (2019). Sustainability of metal powder additive manufacturing. Paper presented at Conference of 16th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing, GCSM 2018 ; Conference Date: 2 October 2018 Through 4 October 2018. Procedia Manufacturing, 33, 139-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability of metal powder additive manufacturing
2019 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 33, p. 139-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Additive manufacturing, or 3D-printing, has attracted attention and raised expectations regarding future production and repair of parts, for example, in the aerospace industry. Various techniques have been utilized to deposit metal alloys for components. It has been suggested that this may offer great benefits in terms of sustainability, in particular, new opportunities for lightweighting. There are, however, outstanding questions about sustainability benefits outside of the use phase. In this paper, the material and manufacturing life-cycle stages were investigated for details produced using INCONEL 718. Energy measurements from an ARCAM A2X Electron Beam Melting system are presented and compared to the embodied energy and indirect CO2-emissions of the feedstock as well as to traditional subtractive manufacturing. It is found that both the metal powder production and the additive manufacturing process itself contribute considerably to total energy use and emissions. Ashby’s 5-step method for assessment of sustainable development is used to briefly discuss economic and social implications of additive manufacturing. © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Keywords
Additive Manufacturing, Sustainibility, EBM, Inconel 718
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering; Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-14465 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2019.04.018 (DOI)2-s2.0-85068564688 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Conference of 16th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing, GCSM 2018 ; Conference Date: 2 October 2018 Through 4 October 2018
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2020-01-17Bibliographically approved
Bonilla Hernández, A. E., Beno, T. & Fredriksson, C. (2017). Energy and Cost Estimation of a Feature-based Machining Operation on HRSA. Paper presented at 24th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering (CIRP LCE), Kamakura, JAPAN, MAR 08-10, 2017. Procedia CIRP, 61(Supplement C), 511-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy and Cost Estimation of a Feature-based Machining Operation on HRSA
2017 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 61, no Supplement C, p. 511-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Forward-looking manufacturing companies aim for sustainable production with low environmental footprint. This is true also for aerospace engine-makers, although their environmental impact mostly occurs during the use-phase of their products. Materials, such as Nickel alloys, are used for special applications where other materials will not withstand tough working conditions in terms of pressure and temperature. Heat Resistant Super Alloys are, however, considered difficult to machine and cutting tools will wear off rapidly. In this paper, a simple way to estimate the energy required, the cost and environmental footprint to produce a work piece using standard engineering software is presented. The results show that for a hypothetical 3 tonne work piece, Inconel 718 will be considerably cheaper and require less water but will require more energy, and has considerably larger CO2 footprint than Waspaloy.

Keywords
Energy use, sustainable consumption and production, production cost, environmental footprint, HRSA, feature based machining
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
ENGINEERING, Manufacturing and materials engineering; Production Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hv:diva-11573 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2016.11.141 (DOI)000404511900089 ()2-s2.0-85020019067 (Scopus ID)
Conference
24th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering (CIRP LCE), Kamakura, JAPAN, MAR 08-10, 2017
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2020-02-06Bibliographically approved
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